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The Summer Garden, St. Petersburg, Russia.
  • Yuyuan Garden located beside the City God Temple in the northeast of the Old City of Shanghai, China.
  • Gardens of Versailles, Château of Versailles, Versailles, France.
  • Japanese garden in Tivoli, Vesterbrogade 3, DK-1630 Copenhagen K, Denmark.
  • Yoyogi Park, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
  • The Summer Garden, St. Petersburg, Russia.
  • Ueno Park, Ueno district of Taitō, Tokyo, Japan.
  • Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 3AB, England, U.K.

World's Top 50 Best & Most Beautiful Gardens & Parks

A GARDEN is a planned space, usually outdoors, set aside for the display, cultivation, and enjoyment of plants and other forms of nature. The garden can incorporate both natural and man-made materials. The most common form today is known as a residential garden, but the term garden has traditionally been a more general one. Western gardens are almost universally based on plants, with garden often signifying a shortened form of botanical garden.

A PARK is an area of open space provided for recreational use. It can be in its natural or semi-natural state, or planted, and is set aside for human enjoyment or for the protection of wildlife or natural habitats. It may consist of rocks, soil, water, flora and fauna and grass areas, but may also contain buildings and other artifacts such as play grounds. Many natural parks are protected by law.

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE is the design of outdoor public areas, landmarks, and structures to achieve environmental, social-behavioral, or aesthetic outcomes. It involves the systematic investigation of existing social, ecological, and soil conditions and processes in the landscape, and the design of interventions that will produce the desired outcome. The scope of the profession includes landscape design; site planning; stormwater management; environmental restoration; parks and recreation planning; visual resource management; green infrastructure planning and provision; and private estate and residence landscape master planning and design; all at varying scales of design, planning and management. A practitioner in the profession of landscape architecture is called a landscape architect.

Gardening & Parks Resources Top 50 Famous Gardens & Parks Top 300 Famous Homes & Houses
  • 5 terrifying plants that will probably give you nightmares - The Telegraph.
  • 10 Of The World's Best Parks For Enjoying Spring Weather - Business Insider.
  • A Lisbon Home With a Vertical Garden - The New York Times.
  • A Secret Section of Central Park Reopens - The New York Times.
  • Gardens of the Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte designed by André Le Nôtre (1613-1700).
  • AndrÉ Le NÔtre - (1613-1700). French landscape architect and the principal gardener of King Louis XIV of France. Most notably, he was responsible for the design and construction of the park of the Palace of Versailles, and his work represents the height of the French formal garden style, or jardin À la franÇaise.
  • Anna Wintour’s Wild Garden.
  • Anna Wintour’s Wild Garden - "A stroll through the editor’s romantic and meandering 40 acres - cultivated over the last 20 years by her friend, the landscape designer Miranda Brooks."
  • Botanical garden - Wikipedia.
  • Capability Brown's most amazing landscapes - The Telegraph.
  • Capability Brown, the Master of the English Garden - The New York Times.
  • CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW | Great Spring Show - garden show held each year on five days in May by the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) in the grounds of the Royal Hospital Chelsea in Chelsea, London, U.K. Perhaps the most famous gardening event in the world and part of London's summer social season. The Chelsea Flower Show has been held in the grounds of the Chelsea Hospital, London every year since 1913, apart from gaps during the two World Wars. It used to be Britain's largest flower show (it has now been overtaken by RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show), but is still the most prestigious.
  • Chelsea Flower Show: 100 years in pictures - The Telegraph.
  • Chelsea Flower Show: houses with the most incredible gardens - The Telegraph.
  • Chelsea Flower Show 2016: Best in Show and the medal winners in pictures - The Telegraph.
  • Chinese garden - Wikipedia.
  • Conservatory - Wikipedia.
  • English landscape garden - Wikipedia.
  • Everything you need to know about Capability Brown - The Telegraph.
  • Exotic gardens that will banish the winter blues - The Telegraph.
  • Explore 'Capability' Brown's landscape gardens - National Trust.
  • Frederick Law Olmsted - (1822-1903). American landscape architect, journalist, social critic, and public administrator. He is popularly considered to be the father of American landscape architecture. Famous for co-designing many well-known urban parks with his senior partner Calvert Vaux, including Central Park and Prospect Park in New York City, the George Washington Vanderbilt II Biltmore Estate in Asheville, North Carolina, as well as Elm Park (Worcester, Massachusetts), considered by many to be the first municipal park in America.
  • French formal garden - also called jardin à la française.
  • French landscape garden - Wikipedia.
  • Garden - Wikipedia.
  • Garden Bridge, London vs. Pier 55, New York: why do New York and London think so differently? - The Guardian.
  • Gardening - Wikipedia.
  • gardenvisit.com - "The garden landscape guide." With over 10,000 pages of text and 10,000 images.
  • Grandi Giardini Italiani - "Discover the network of the most beautiful gardens created in Italy!"
  • Greenhouse - Wikipedia.
  • Hampton Court Palace Flower Show - the largest flower show in the world. The Show is held in early July, and run by the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) at Hampton Court Palace in southwest London. The show features show gardens, floral marquees and pavilions, talks and demonstrations. Erected on the north and south sides of the Long Water in Hampton Court Park, it is the second major national show after the Chelsea Flower Show but has a different character, focusing more on environmental issues, growing your own food and vegetables and cookery, while also offering opportunities to buy gardening accessories, plants and flowers.
  • Henry Hoare - (1705–1785), known as Henry the Magnificent, was an English banker and garden owner-designer. 'The first landscape gardener, who showed in a single work, genius of the highest order.'
  • How a husband-and-wife duo salvaged West Dean gardens - The Telegraph.
  • how Capability Brown transformed this green & pleasant land - "The 300th anniversary of ‘Capability’ Brown’s birth is the ideal time to hail the design and horticultural genius who reshaped far more than the contours of our national landscape."
  • Inside the 17th century Versailles vegetable garden - The Telegraph.
  • Inside the new National Trust gardens - The Telegraph.
  • Italian Renaissance garden - Wikipedia.
  • Japan's cherry blossom season: Trip of a Lifetime - The Telegraph.
  • Japanese garden - Wikipedia.
  • Emperor Fountain, Chatsworth House, Derbyshire, England.
  • Joseph Paxton - (1803-1865). English gardener, architect and Member of Parliament, best known for designing The Crystal Palace. The 6th Duke of Devonshire offered the 20-year-old Paxton the position of Head gardener at Chatsworth, which was considered one of the finest landscaped gardens of the time. One of his first projects was to redesign the garden around the new north wing of the house and to set up a 'pinetum', a collection of conifers which developed into a 40-acre arboretum which still exists. In the process he became skilled in moving even mature trees. While at Chatsworth Gardens, he built enormous fountains: The Emperor Fountain in 1844 was twice the height of Nelson's Column, which required the creation of the Emperor Lake on the hill top above the gardens, and the excavation of 100,000 cubic yards of earth.
  • Kitchen garden - Wikipedia.
  • Lachaume, Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré, 75008 Paris, France.
  • Lachaume - since 1845. "Maître fleuriste since 1845, Lachaume has little changed since the time or Marcel Proust came daily to decorate his buttonhole with a fresh cattleya."
  • Lancelot 'Capability' Brown (1716-1783).
  • Lancelot 'Capability' Brown - (1716-1783). English landscape architect. He is remembered as "the last of the great English eighteenth-century artists to be accorded his due", and "England's greatest gardener". He designed over 170 parks, many of which still endure.
  • Landscape architecture - Wikipedia.
  • List of botanical gardens - Wikipedia.
  • List of gardens - Wikipedia.
  • List of landscape gardens - Wikipedia.
  • Mannerism - style in European art that emerged in the later years of the Italian High Renaissance around 1520, lasting until about 1580 in Italy. Stylistically, Mannerism encompasses a variety of approaches influenced by, and reacting to, the harmonious ideals associated with artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, and early Michelangelo. Where High Renaissance art emphasizes proportion, balance, and ideal beauty, Mannerism exaggerates such qualities, often resulting in compositions that are asymmetrical or unnaturally elegant.
  • Moroccan Garden of One Man’s Dreams - The New York Times.
  • National Cherry Blossom Festival - spring celebration in Washington, D.C., commemorating the March 27, 1912, gift of Japanese cherry trees from Mayor Yukio Ozaki of Tokyo City to the city of Washington.
  • New York’s Secret Garden - The New York Times.
  • Orangery - Wikipedia.
  • Park - Wikipedia.
  • Plant Heritage - "Plant Heritage's (NCCPG's) mission is to conserve, grow, propagate, document and make available the amazing resource of cultivated plants that exists in the UK."
  • Poland approves large-scale logging in Europe's last primeval forest - The Guardian.
  • Remarkable Gardens of France - Wikipedia.
  • Rose garden - Wikipedia.
  • six clever ways to keep cut flowers alive - The Telegraph.
  • The best Chinese gardens to visit - The Telegraph.
  • The Garden Villa - Aamer Architects.
  • The How-on-Earth Garden - The New York Times.
  • The Lost Gardens of Emily Dickinson - The New York Times.
  • The secret's out on London's most underrated park - The Telegraph.
  • Top 10 trees for gardens - "Can you identify them from their leaves?"
  • Top 12 City Parks in the World - RatesToGo.
  • Topiary - the horticultural practice of training live perennial plants by clipping the foliage and twigs of trees, shrubs and subshrubs to develop and maintain clearly defined shapes, perhaps geometric or fanciful.
  • Watch the building of The Telegraph's Chelsea Flower Show garden from start to finish -The Telegraph.
  • Water in view: the genius of Capability Brown - The Telegraph.
  • World's Best Parks, According To TripAdvisor Users - The Huffington Post.
  • World's Most Beautiful City Parks - Travel + Leisure.
  • world's most romantic gardens - The Telegraph.
  • World Naked Gardening Day: gardeners around the globe strip off - The Telegraph.
  • Zen garden - aka Japanese rock garden.
  • Top 50 Famous Gardens & Parks
  • Alexander Garden, next to Palace Square and behind the Admiralty, St. Petersburg, Russia.
  • Alexander Garden - next to Palace Square & behind the Admiralty, St. Petersburg, Russia.
  • Biltmore Estate, 1 Lodge St, Asheville, NC 28803, U.S.A.
  • Biltmore Estate Gardens - 1 Lodge St, Asheville, North Carolina 28803, U.S.A.
  • Blenheim Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire OX20 1PP, England, U.K.
  • Blenheim Palace Gardens - Woodstock, Oxfordshire OX20 1PP, England, U.K.
  • Giardino di Boboli, Piazza Pitti, 1, 50125 Firenze, Italy.
  • Boboli Gardens - Giardino di Boboli, Piazza Pitti, 1, 50125 Florence, Italy. The Gardens, behind the Pitti Palace, the main seat of the Medici grand dukes of Tuscany at Florence, are some of the first and most familiar formal 16th-century Italian gardens. The mid-16th-century garden style, as it was developed here, incorporated longer axial developments, wide gravel avenues, a considerable "built" element of stone, the lavish employment of statuary and fountains, and a proliferation of detail, coordinated in semi-private and public spaces that were informed by classical accents: grottos, nympheums, garden temples and the like. The openness of the garden, with an expansive view of the city, was unconventional for its time.
  • Butchart Gardens, 800 Benvenuto Avenue, Brentwood Bay, British Columbia V8X 3X4, Canada.
  • Butchart Gardens - group of floral display gardens in Brentwood Bay, British Columbia, Canada, located near Victoria on Vancouver Island. "The renown of the family owned gardens is widespread. Each year over a million bedding plants in some 900 varieties give you uninterrupted bloom from March through October. Almost a million people visit annually for spring’s colourful flowering bulbs; summer’s riot of colour, entertainment and Saturday Fireworks; fall’s russets and golds; the Magic of Christmas’ decorations; and winter’s peacefulness."
  • Castello di Vignanello, Vignanello, Viterbo, Italy.
  • Castello di Vignanello - Vignanello, Viterbo, Italy. The history of Vignanello dates back to 853, when the Benedectine monks erected a citadel on the site. Ottavia Orsini, the wife of Ortensia's nephew, Marcantonio Marescotti, oversaw the creation of the wonderful Italian garden, to this day regarded as one of the most beautiful Italian parterres, at the centre of which one finds a huge basin surrounded by a balustrade: a perfectly rectangular space crossed by four avenues and subdivided into twelve aligned parterres, composed of mixed hedges of bay, laurel, and box.
  • Central Park, Manhattan in New York City, NY, U.S.A.
  • Central Park - public park at the center of Manhattan in New York City. The park initially opened in 1857, on 778 acres (315 ha) of city-owned land (it is 840 acres today). Construction began the same year, continued during the American Civil War, and was completed in 1873. Central Park is the most visited urban park in the United States.
  • The Maze, Chatsworth Garden, Bakewell, Derbyshire DE45 1PP, U.K.
  • Chatsworth Garden - Derbyshire, England. Chatsworth's garden attracts around 300,000 visitors a year. It has a complex blend of different features from six different centuries and covers 105 acres (0.42 sq km). The garden is surrounded by a wall 1.75 miles (2.8 km) long. It sits on the eastern side of the valley of the Derwent River and blends into the landscape of the surrounding park, which covers 1,000 acres (4.0 sq km). The woods on the moors to the east of the valley form a backdrop to the garden. There is a staff of approximately 20 full-time gardeners.
  • Yuyuan Garden located beside the City God Temple in the northeast of the Old City of Shanghai, China.
  • Chinese garden - the Yuyuan Garden (Garden of Happiness or Garden of Peace) in Shanghai (created in 1559) shows all the elements of a classical Chinese garden – water, architecture, vegetation, and rocks.
  • Classical Gardens of Suzhou, No. 12 Gongyuan Road, Canglang District, Jiangsu Province, Suzhou City 215006, China.
  • Classical Gardens of Suzhou - classical Chinese garden design, which seeks to recreate natural landscapes in miniature, is nowhere better illustrated than in the nine gardens in the historic city of Suzhou. They are generally acknowledged to be masterpieces of the genre. Dating from the 11th-19th century, the gardens reflect the profound metaphysical importance of natural beauty in Chinese culture in their meticulous design.
  • Englischer Garten, Liebergesellstraße 8, 80802 Munich, Germany.
  • Englischer Garten - large public park in the centre of Munich, Bavaria, stretching from the city centre to the northeastern city limits. It was created in 1789 by Sir Benjamin Thompson (1753–1814). Germany.
  • The landscape garden of Stourhead, near Mere, Wiltshire, England.
  • English landscape garden - of Stourhead, near Mere, Wiltshire, England.
  • Frederiksborg Castle Gardens, DK-3400 Hillerød, Denmark.
  • Frederiksborg Castle Gardens - landscaped and tiered baroque garden with elegant fountains and parterres. The Museum of National History, Frederiksborg Castle, Rendelaggerbakken 3, DK-3400 Hillerød, Denmark.
  • French formal garden of Château de Villandry (Indre-et-Loire), France.
  • French formal garden - of the Château de Villandry (Indre-et-Loire), France.
  • Gardens of the Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte designed by André Le Nôtre (1613-1700). French landscape architect and the principal gardener of King Louis XIV of France.
  • Gardens of the ChÂteau de Vaux-le-Vicomte - baroque French château located in Maincy, near Melun, 55 km southeast of Paris in the Seine-et-Marne département of France. Designed by André Le Nôtre (1613-1700). French landscape architect and the principal gardener of King Louis XIV of France. Most notably, he was responsible for the design and construction of the park of the Palace of Versailles, and his work represents the height of the French formal garden style, or jardin À la franÇaise.
  • Garden of the Taj Mahal, Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • Garden of the Taj Mahal - Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • Gardens of the Alhambra, Granada, Andalusia, Spain.
  • Gardens of the Alhambra - palace and fortress complex located in Granada, Andalusia, Spain. The park (Alameda de la Alhambra), which is overgrown with wildflowers and grass in the spring, was planted by the Moors with roses, oranges, and myrtles; its most characteristic feature, however, is the dense wood of English elms brought by the Duke of Wellington in 1812. The park has a multitude of nightingales and is usually filled with the sound of running water from several fountains and cascades.
  • Gardens of Versailles, Palace of Versailles, Place d'Armes, 78000 Versailles, France.
  • Gardens of Versailles - occupy part of what was once the Domaine royal de Versailles, the royal demesne of the château of Versailles. Situated to the west of the palace, the gardens cover some 800 hectacres of land. France.
  • Golden Gate Park, 501 Stanyan St, San Francisco, CA 94117, U.S.A.
  • Golden Gate Park - located in San Francisco, California, is a large urban park consisting of 1,017 acres (411.6 ha) of public grounds. Configured as a rectangle, it is similar in shape but 20 percent larger than Central Park in New York, to which it is often compared. It is over three miles (4.8 km) long east to west, and about half a mile (0.8 km) north to south. U.S.A.
  • Green Animals Topiary Garden, 380 Corys Lane, Portsmouth, RI 02871, U.S.A.
  • Green Animals Topiary Garden - "This small country estate in Portsmouth was purchased in 1872 by Thomas E. Brayton (1844-1939), Treasurer of the Union Cotton Manufacturing Company in Fall River, Massachusetts. It consisted of seven acres of land, a white clapboard summer residence, farm outbuildings, a pasture and a vegetable garden. Gardener Joseph Carreiro, superintendent of the property from 1905 to 1945, and his son-in-law, George Mendonca, superintendent until 1985, were responsible for creating the topiaries. There are more than 80 pieces of topiary throughout the gardens, including animals and birds, geometric figures and ornamental designs, sculpted from California privet, yew, and English boxwood."
  • Green Garden at Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies, Via de Vincigliata 26, 50135 Fiesole, Florence, Tuscany, Italy.
  • Green Garden at Villa I Tatti - The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies, Via de Vincigliata 26, 50014 Fiesole, Florence, Tuscany, Italy. The famous art historian, Bernard Berenson, bought the Villa I Tatti in 1905 and (in 1909) commissioned two Englishmen (Cecil Ross Pinsent and Geoffrey Scott) to re-design the garden. Scott was famous as the author of a book on The Architecture of Humanism. Pinsent was a young and unknown architect. They began work at a time when Arts and Crafts designers, inspired by Blomfield, Sedding and others, were filled with enthusiasm for Italian renaissance gardens.The results of their work has many renaissance features, and a friendly pastiche charm, but it does not have the disciplined 'feel' of a genuine renaissance garden.
  • The greenhouse at the Saint Petersburg Botanical Garden, Russia.
  • Greenhouse - at the Saint Petersburg Botanical Garden, Russia. The oldest botanical garden in Russia.
  • Hyde Park, Greater London W2 2UH, England, U.K.
  • Hyde Park - since 1637. One of the largest parks in central London, and one of the Royal Parks of London, famous for its Speakers' Corner. England, U.K.
  • Villa Lante at Bagnaia near Viterbo, central Italy.
  • Italian Renaissance garden - of Villa Lante at Bagnaia near Viterbo, central Italy.
  • Recreated garden of the old Kyoto Imperial Palace, Japan.
  • Japanese garden - recreated garden of the old Kyoto Imperial Palace, Japan.
  • Japanese garden in Tivoli, Vesterbrogade 3, DK-1630 Copenhagen K, Denmark.
  • Japanese garden in Tivoli - Vesterbrogade 3, DK-1630 Copenhagen K, Denmark.
  • Jardin des Plantes, 57 Rue Cuvier, 75005 Paris, France.
  • Jardin des Plantes - 57 Rue Cuvier, 75005 Paris, France. Since 1635. The main botanical garden in France. About 4500 plants are arranged by family on a one hectare (10,000 sq. m.) plot. Three hectares are devoted to horticultural displays of decorative plants. An Alpine garden has 3000 species with world-wide representation. Specialized buildings, such as a large Art Deco winter garden, and Mexican and Australian hothouses display regional plants, not native to France. The Rose Garden, created in 1990, has hundreds of species of roses and rose trees.
  • Jardin Exotique de Monaco, 62, boulevard du Jardin Exotique, La Condamine, 98000 Monaco.
  • Jardin Exotique de Monaco - since 1933. 62, boulevard du Jardin Exotique, La Condamine, 98000 Monaco. The Exotic Garden of Monaco. Has a rich collection of over a thousand species of succulent plants, especially cactuses. Also home to the Observatory Cave and the Anthropology Museum, founded in 1902 by Prince Albert I.
  • Jardin Majorelle, Rue Yves Saint Laurent, Marrakesh, Marocco.
  • Jardin Majorelle - twelve-acre botanical garden and artist's landscape garden in Marrakech, Morocco. It was designed by the expatriate French artist Jacques Majorelle in the 1920s and 1930s, during the colonial period when Morocco was a protectorate of France. The garden has been open to the public since 1947. Since 1980 the garden has been owned by Yves Saint-Laurent and Pierre Bergé. After Yves Saint Laurent died in 2008 his ashes were scattered in the Majorelle Garden.
  • The kitchen garden of Château de Villandry (Indre-et-Loire), France.
  • Kitchen garden - of the Château de Villandry is a castle-palace located in Villandry (Indre-et-Loire), France.
  • Longwood Gardens, 1001 Longwood Rd, Kennett Square, PA 19348, U.S.A.
  • Longwood Gardens - consists of over 1,077 acres (4.2 sq km) of gardens, woodlands, and meadows in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, United States in the Brandywine Creek Valley. It is one of the premier botanical gardens in the United States and is open to visitors year-round to enjoy exotic plants and horticulture (both indoor and outdoor), events and performances, seasonal and themed attractions, as well as take part in educational lectures, courses, and workshops.
  • The original location of Antonioni's 'Blow Up' (1966) cult movie located in Maryon Park in Charlton, Greenwich, London, England, U.K.
  • Maryon Park - urban public park located in Charlton in the Royal Borough of Greenwich, London, England, U.K. The park was the filming location of key scenes in Blowup (1966), a drama mystery-thriller film directed by Michelangelo Antonioni and starring David Hemmings, Sarah Miles and Vanessa Redgrave. The park is little changed since the making of the film.
  • Muskau Park, 02953 Bad Muskau, Germany.
  • Muskau Park - landscape park in the Upper Lusatia region of Germany and Poland. It is the largest and one of the most famous English gardens in Central Europe, stretching along both sides of the German–Polish border on the Lusatian Neisse. The park was laid out from 1815 onwards at the behest of Prince Hermann von Pückler-Muskau (1785–1871), centered around his Schloss Muskau residence. In July 2004, Muskau Park was added to the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites.
  • The Orangerie of Versailles, Palace of Versailles, Place d'Armes, 78000 Versailles, France.
  • Orangerie of Versailles - built by Jules Hardouin-Mansart between 1684 and 1686, that is to say, before work on the palace had even begun. It is an example of many such prestigious extensions of grand gardens in Europe designed both to shelter tender plants and impress visitors. In the winter, the Versailles Orangerie houses more than a thousand trees in boxes. Most of them are orange trees. From May to October, they are put outdoors in the Parterre Bas.
  • Orto botanico di Padova, Via Orto Botanico, 15, 35123 Padua, Italy.
  • Orto botanico di Padova - botanical garden in Padua, now in the northeastern part of Italy. Founded in 1545 by the Venetian Republic Republic of Venice, it is the world's oldest academic botanical garden that is still in its original location. The garden, affiliated with the University of Padua, currently covers roughly 22,000 square meters, and is known for its special collections and historical design.
  • The Palm House - Schloss Schönbrunn, Schönbrunn Palace Park, Schönbrunner Schlosstraße 47, 1130 Vienna, Austria.
  • Palm House - Schloss Schönbrunn - Schönbrunn Palace Park, Schönbrunner Schlosstraße 47, 1130 Vienna, Austria. Large greenhouse featuring plants from around the world. It was opened in 1882. It is the most prominent of the four greenhouses in Schönbrunn Palace Park, and is also among the largest botanical exhibits of its kind in the world, with around 4,500 plant species.
  • Park of Fontainebleau, Château de Fontainebleau, 77300 Fontainebleau, Department of Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, France.
  • Park of Fontainebleau - used by the kings of France from the 12th century, the medieval royal hunting lodge of Fontainebleau, standing at the heart of a vast forest in the Île-de-France, was transformed, enlarged and embellished in the 16th century by François I, who wanted to make a 'New Rome' of it. Surrounded by an immense park, the Italianate palace combines Renaissance and French artistic traditions.
  • Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 3AB, England, U.K.
  • Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew - opened in 1759. "The largest and most diverse living collection in the world." Number of species: more than 30,000.
  • Biltmore Estate, 1 Lodge St, Asheville, NC 28803, U.S.A.
  • RyŌan-ji Zen garden - the temple garden is considered to be one of the finest examples of a kare-sansui, a Japanese rock garden, or zen garden, in Japan.
  • Sanssouci Park, Potsdam, Germany.
  • Sanssouci Park - with 500 ha of parks and 150 buildings constructed between 1730 and 1916, Potsdam's complex of palaces and parks forms an artistic whole, whose eclectic nature reinforces its sense of uniqueness. It extends into the district of Berlin-Zehlendorf, with the palaces and parks lining the banks of the River Havel and Lake Glienicke. Voltaire stayed at the Sans-Souci Palace, built under Frederick II between 1745 and 1747.
  • Sofiyivsky Park, Uman city, Cherkasy Oblast (Central Ukraine).
  • Sofiyivsky Park - arboretum (type of botanical garden) and a scientific-researching institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. The park is located in the northern part of the Uman city, Cherkasy Oblast (Central Ukraine), near the river Kamianka. Some areas of the park are reminiscent of an English garden. Today the park is a popular recreational spot, annually visited by 500 000 visitors. Sofiyivka is a scenic landmark of world gardening design at the beginning of 19th century. The park accounts for over 2,000 types of trees and brush (local and exotic) among which are taxodium (marsh cypress), Weymouth Pine, tulip tree, platanus, ginkgo, and many others.
  • Stourhead in Wiltshire, England, designed by Henry Hoare (1705–1785), 'the first landscape gardener, who showed in a single work, genius of the highest order'.
  • Stourhead - "A breathtaking 18th century landscape garden with lakeside walks, grottoes and classical temples is only the beginning." Described as 'a living work of art' when they first opened in the 1740s. 1,072-hectare (2,650-acre) estate at the source of the River Stour near Mere, Wiltshire, England. The estate includes a Palladian mansion, the village of Stourton, gardens, farmland, and woodland. Stourhead is part owned with the National Trust since 1946.
  • Stowe Landscape Gardens, Buckinghamshire, England, U.K.
  • Stowe Landscape Gardens - Buckinghamshire, England, U.K. In the 1690s, Stowe had a modest early-baroque parterre garden, owing more to Italy than to France, but it has not survived, and, within a relatively short time, Stowe became widely renowned for its magnificent gardens created by Lord Cobham. The Landscape Garden was created in three main phases, showing the development of garden design in 18th-century England.
  • The Summer Garden, St. Petersburg, Russia.
  • Summer Garden - occupies an island between the Fontanka, Moika, and the Swan Canal in Saint Petersburg and shares its name with the adjacent Summer Palace of Peter the Great. Russia.
  • The Hundred Fountains at Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Lazio, Italy.
  • The Hundred Fountains at Villa d'Este - the Italian Renaissance garden of Ville d'Este, Tivoli, Lazio, Italy.
  • The Roof Gardens, 99 Kensington High Street, London W8 5SA, U.K.
  • The Roof Gardens - 99 Kensington High Street, London W8 5SA, U.K. Located one hundred feet above Kensington High Street in central London, The Roof Gardens and Babylon Restaurant are truly spectacular. Originally above Derry and Tom's department store which opened in 1933, The Roof Gardens were the dream child of the vice president of Barkers, Trevor Bowen, who employed landscape architect Ralph Hancock to realise his vision. There are three themed gardens, with over 70 full size trees, a flowing stream stocked with fish and our resident flamingos Bill, Ben, Splosh and Pecks.
  • Tuileries Gardens, Jardins des Tuileries, Place de la Concorde, 75008 Paris. France.
  • Tuileries Gardens - Jardins des Tuileries, Place de la Concorde, 75008 Paris. France. public garden located between the Louvre Museum and the Place de la Concorde in the 1st arrondissement of Paris. Created by Catherine de Medicis as the garden of the Tuileries Palace in 1564, it was eventually opened to the public in 1667, and became a public park after the French Revolution.
  • Ueno Park, Ueno district of Taitō, Tokyo, Japan.
  • Ueno Park - spacious public park in the Ueno district of Taitō, Tokyo, Japan. The park was established in 1873 on lands formerly belonging to the temple of Kan'ei-ji. Amongst the country's first public parks, it was founded following the western example as part of the borrowing and assimilation of international practices that characterizes the early Meiji period. The home of a number of major museums, Ueno Park is also celebrated in spring for its cherry blossoms and hanami. In recent times the park and its attractions have drawn over ten million visitors a year, making it Japan's most popular city park.
  • White House Rose Garden, White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. 20500, U.S.A.
  • White House Rose Garden - garden bordering the Oval Office and the West Wing of the White House. Established in 1913 by Ellen Loise Axson Wilson, wife of Woodrow Wilson.
  • Yoyogi Park, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
  • Yoyogi Park - one of the largest parks in Tokyo, Japan.
The Card

Upcoming VIP Privilege Membership Card

The International Man will in the near future be launching its own PRIVILEGE & BENEFIT VIP MEMBERSHIP CARD - named simply 'The Card'. Members will receive special privileges, benefits and preferential rates with selected partner hotels, restaurants, our LUXURY WEBSHOP, and more. Enter your name and e-mail address to receive FREE INFO about 'The Card' HERE.

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