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Amazon.com online bookstore.
  • Amazon.com online bookstore.
  • Shakespeare & Company Bookshop, 37 Rue de la Bûcherie, 75005 Paris, France.
  • Inside Shakespeare & Company Bookshop, 37 Rue de la Bûcherie, 75005 Paris, France.
  • Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world.
  • Library of Strahov Monastery, (The Theological Hall), Prague, Czech Republic.
  • The Black Diamond (Royal Danish Library), Søren Kierkegaards Plads 1, 1221 Copenhagen K, Denmark.
  • Royal Portuguese Reading Room, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
  • Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 121 Wall Street, New Haven, CT 06511, U.S.A.
  • Philological Library of Freie Universität Berlin, Habelschwerdter Allee 45, 14195 Berlin, Germany.
  • Interior of the British Library, with the smoked glass wall of the King's Library in the background.
  • Library of Congress is the research library of the United States Congress, the de facto national library of the United States of America. It is one of the two largest libraries in the world by shelf space and number of books, the other being The British Library.
  • English author, journalist and naval intelligence officer Ian Fleming (1908-1964) - best known for his James Bond series of spy novels.
  • Frankfurt Book Fair, Germany - the world's largest trade fair for books.
  • Kindle Paperwhite - Wi-Fi, Paperwhite Display, Higher Resolution, Higher Contrast, Built-in Light.
  • The Gutenberg Bible was the first major book printed with movable type in the West.
  • The Nobel Prize in Literature.
  • Karl Lagerfeld posing in his Parisian bookstore: 7L, 7 Rue de Lille, 75007 Paris, France.
  • Detective fiction writer Raymond Chandler (1888-1959).
  • The Great Courses - audio & video lectures from the world's best professors.
  • The New York Review of Books.
  • Self-publishing is the publication of any book or other media by the author of the work, without the involvement of an established third-party publisher.
  • Books of the month.

Books | Bookstore | Fairs | Libraries | Prizes | Writers

Audiobooks (Top 15) Authors (200+) Backgammon Bookstore (10)
Bitcoin Bookstore (15) Book Clubs (Top 15) Book Fairs (Top 10)
Book News & Resources: A-Z (100+) Book Review Magazines (Top 100+) Books of the Month (100+)
Booksellers (Online) (Top 25) Bookshops (Top 40) Bookstore (Online) (36 categories)
Celebrity Bookstore (10) Chess Bookstore (12) Cocktails Bookstore (15)
Crime & Thriller Writers: A-Z (200+) Cryptocurrency Bookstore (15) E-Book Readers (Top 30)
E-Books (Top 30) Famous Houses Bookstore (15+) Genealogy Bookstore (9)
Health Food Bookstore (20+) James Bond Bookstore (37) James Bond Resources: A-Z (800+)
Libraries (Top 25) Literary Magazines (Top 100+) Literary Prizes (Top 75)
Men's Tailors Bookstore (10) Motivational Bookstore (40) Poker Bookstore (10)
Rich People Bookstore (26) Sartorial Bookstore (10) Self-Publishing (Top 20)
Skiing Bookstore (5) Tax Haven Bookstore (60+) Wine Bookstore (10)

    "Beware of the man of one book." - Author unknown.

    "The pen is mightier than the sword." - Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton.

    "Beware of the one who has read only one book." - Thomas Aquinas.

    "A library is not a luxury but one of the necessities of life." - Henry Ward Beecher.

    "There is more treasure in books than in all the pirate's loot on Treasure Island." - Walt Disney.

    "The reading of all good books is like a conversation with the most cultivated men of past centuries who have been their authors." - John Ruskin.

    "I must have books everywhere. They’re the soul of a room - they reveal the taste, the interests, and the secrets of whoever lives there." - Fashion designer Diane von Furstenberg.

    A BOOK is a set or collection of written, printed, illustrated, or blank sheets, made of paper, parchment, or other material, usually fastened together to hinge at one side. A single sheet within a book is called a leaf, and each side of a leaf is called a page. A book produced in electronic format is known as an e-book.

    Books may also refer to a literature work, or a main division of such a work. In library and information science, a book is called a monograph, to distinguish it from serial periodicals such as magazines, journals or newspapers. The body of all written works including books is literature.

    In novels, a book may be divided into several large sections, also called books (Book 1, Book 2, Book 3, etc).

    A lover of books is usually referred to as a bibliophile, a bibliophilist, or a philobiblist, or, more informally, a bookworm.

    A store where books are bought and sold is a bookstore or bookshop. Books can also be borrowed from libraries.

    MORE QUOTES ABOUT BOOKS:

    "A good book has no ending." - R.D. Cumming.

    "People die, but books never die." - Anonymous.

    "A library is a hospital for the mind." - Anonymous.

    "No furniture is so charming as books." - Sydney Smith.

    "Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body." - Joseph Addison.

    "A good book on your shelf is a friend that turns its back on you and remains a friend." - Anonymous.

    "Books are not made for furniture, but there is nothing else that so beautifully furnishes a house." - Henry Ward Beecher.

    "Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers." - Charles W. Eliot.

  • 100 Best Novels (Modern Library).
  • 4am starts & spinach smoothies: Da Vinci Code's Dan Brown on how to write a bestseller - "As he sets out to spill his secrets in an online masterclass, Brown talks about bad reviews, his habit of hanging upside down and the challenge of writing fiction in the age of Trump."
  • 7 digital libraries you can visit from your couch - "Check this out: You can still celebrate National Library Week, which begins Sunday, at home. Here are seven digital libraries with specialized collections you can visit to honor the contributions of our nation's libraries and library workers."
  • 10 of the most entertaining drinking bouts in literature - The Guardian.
  • 10 of the richest book deals of all time - The Guardian.
  • 16 Best True Crime Books of All Time - "From classics like Truman Capote's In Cold Blood to newer page-turners like Ron Stallworth's Black Klansman, these books are must reads."
  • 21 Shakespearean quotes you didn't even know you were using - The Telegraph.
  • 25 books that will blow your mind - Business Insider.
  • 25 Expert Tips to Reading WAY More Books This Year - "Instead of trying to power through a book that you're not enjoying, put it down."
  • 30 great opening lines in literature - The Telegraph.
  • 50 Best Memoirs of the Past 50 Years - "The New York Times’s book critics select the most outstanding memoirs published since 1969."
  • 100 best books of the 21st century - "Dazzling debut novels, searing polemics, the history of humanity and trailblazing memoirs ... Read our pick of the best books since 2000."
  • 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century - list of the best English-language novels of the 20th century as selected by the Modern Library, an American publishing company owned by Random House.
  • 100 Best Novels - The Guardian.
  • 100 greatest British novels - BBC.
  • 100 greatest novels of all time - The Guardian.
  • 100 Notable Books of 2017 - The New York Times.
  • ‘1984’ Is a 2017 Must-Read - The New York Times.
  • 2021: Fiction to look out for - "With a host of dazzling second novels in the offing, plus the return of big hitters such as Kazuo Ishiguro and Jon McGregor, 2021 is shaping up to be a special year."
  • 2021: Nonfiction to look out for - "Biographies of Philip Roth and DH Lawrence, the curious death of Robert Maxwell, and dispatches from the Covid frontline."
  • AbeBooks - "Passion for books." AbeBooks is an online marketplace for books. Millions of brand new books, used books, rare books, and out-of-print books are offered for sale through the AbeBooks websites from thousands of booksellers around the world. Readers can find bestsellers, collectors can find rare books, students can find new and used textbooks, and treasure hunters can find long-lost books.
  • Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf & other literary works penned by dictators - ABC News.
  • Airport novel - represent a literary genre that is not so much defined by its plot or cast of stock characters, as much as it is by the social function it serves. An airport novel is typically a fairly long but fast-paced novel of intrigue or adventure that is stereotypically found in the reading fare offered by airport newsstands for travellers to read in the rounds of sitting and waiting that constitute air travel.
  • Algonquin Round Table - was a celebrated group of New York City writers, critics, actors, and wits. Gathering initially as part of a practical joke, members of "The Vicious Circle", as they dubbed themselves, met for lunch each day at the Algonquin Hotel from 1919 until roughly 1929.
  • APPOINTMENT READING - in e-book literature, Appointment Reading is episodic delivery schedule published in sequential electronic installments as recurring TV shows or serialized podcasts.
  • Are Audiobooks As Good For You As Reading? Here’s What Experts Say - TIME Magazine.
  • ASK US 24/7 - "Chat With A Librarian." A service of cooperating New York State libraries. - "We can find answers to your reference questions and provide information on your local library."
  • At home with umberto eco & his book collection - video 1:20.
  • Authors' Club 1891 - "Founded in 1891 to provide a place where writers could meet and talk, the Authors’ Club is one of Britain’s oldest literary institutions, and at the same time one of its most modern, inclusive and welcoming. Within the magnificent premises of the National Liberal Club in Whitehall, we provide a home from home for writers, editors, agents and all those professionally engaged with literature and the publishing industry."
  • Banned Books Week - annual awareness campaign promoted by the American Library Association and Amnesty International, that celebrates the freedom to read, draws attention to banned and challenged books, and highlights persecuted individuals. Held during the last week of September since 1982.
  • Bay Psalm Book - the world's most expensive printed work at US$14.165.000 mio.
  • Bay Psalm Book - the world's most expensive printed work sold at auction at Sotheby's in New York on November 26, 2013 for US$14.165.000 million.
  • Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works - international agreement governing copyright, which was first accepted in Berne, Switzerland, in 1886.
  • best book covers ever? - "What makes an iconic book cover?"
  • Bill Gates: The Billionaire Book Critic - The New York Times.
  • Bill Gates' Bookshelf - The Bill Gates Notes.
  • Bill Gates: This Book Is 'One of the Most Important' - TIME.
  • Blinkist - since 2012. "Big ideas in small packages." Blinkist lets you read the key lessons from 3000+ nonfiction books in 15 min or fewer. Start your free trial today and find out how.
  • ‘Blooks: The Art of Books That Aren’t’ Explores the World of Fake Books - The New York Times.
  • Book & Author Luncheon - (1948-1974). Was created in 1938 by the American Booksellers Association. The program provided a prominent forum for authors to speak to the public about their works in one of the largest markets for books in the United States, New York City.
  • Book clinic: what can I read to help me to reduce my stress levels? - "A health worker seeks a reading cure and is prescribed a wide variety of treatments."
  • Book size - the size of a book is generally measured by the height against the width of a leaf, or sometimes the height and width of its cover. A series of terms is commonly used by libraries and publishers for the general sizes of modern books, ranging from folio (the largest), to quarto (smaller) & octavo (still smaller).
  • Bookplate - also known as ex-libris [Latin, "from the books of..."], is usually a small print or decorative label pasted into a book, often on the inside front cover, to indicate its owner. Simple typographical bookplates are termed "booklabels".
  • Books by women priced 45% lower, study finds - The Guardian.
  • books that makes you dumb - (unofficial) SAT (intelligence) test based on your taste in books.
  • BOOKSELLING - Wikipedia.
  • Cannabis discovered in tobacco pipes found in William Shakespeare's garden - The Telegraph.
  • CENTER FOR INQUIRY LIBRARIES - a blog of CFI Libraries, libraries in general, and librarianship.
  • Charles Edward Mudie - (1818-1890). English publisher and founder of Mudie's Lending Library and Mudie's Subscription Library, was the son of a second-hand bookseller and newsagent. Mudie's efficient distribution system and vast supply of texts revolutionized the circulating library movement, while his "select" library influenced Victorian middle-class values and the structure of the three-volume novel.
  • COFFEE TABLE BOOK - definition & explanation.
  • Comic book convention - event with a primary focus on comic books and comic book culture, in which comic book fans gather to meet creators, experts, and each other.
  • Confessional writing - in literature, confessional writing is a first-person style that is often presented as an ongoing diary or letters, distinguished by revelations of a person's heart and darker motivations.
  • DAILYLIT - read books online by daily email.
  • David Bowie reveals his favourite 100 books - The Telegraph.
  • David Bowie’s top 100 books - the complete list - BowieBookClub.
  • DDC | DEWEY DECIMAL CLASSIFICATION - proprietary system of library classification developed by Melvil Dewey in 1876.
  • Demosthenian Literary Society - founded in 1803. Debating society at The University of Georgia in Athens, GA, U.S.A.
  • "Digital Fugitive" Library Customers - 21st Century Library Blog.
  • E-Book Sales Slip, and Print Is Far From Dead - The New York Times.
  • Epistolary novel - novel written as a series of documents. The usual form is letters, although diary entries, newspaper clippings and other documents are sometimes used. Recently, electronic "documents" such as recordings and radio, blogs, and e-mails have also come into use.
  • Ernest Hemingway's Louis Vuitton library trunk.
  • Ernest Hemingway's Louis Vuitton library trunk.
  • Ernest Hemingway's Louis Vuitton library trunk - Recently found in The Ritz, Paris, the trunk is a veritable trove of the author’s works, including a long lost draft of A Moveable Feast.
  • Erratum - (plurals: errata, corrigenda) (comes from Latin: errata corrige) is a correction of a published text. An erratum is most commonly issued shortly after its original text is published.
  • Erratum - (plurals: errata, corrigenda) (comes from Latin: errata corrige) is a correction of a published text. An erratum is most commonly issued shortly after its original text is published.
  • EUROPEANA - "Think Culture." Search through the cultural collections of Europe. It links you to over 53 million digital items (2018).
  • 100 classics set, Everyman's Library.
  • Everyman's Library - series of reprints of classic literature, primarily from the Western canon. It is currently published in hardback by Random House. Everyman's Library was conceived in 1905 by London publisher Joseph Malaby Dent, whose goal was to create a 1,000-volume library of world literature that was affordable for, and that appealed to, every kind of person, from students to the working classes to the cultural elite. By 1975, Dent's vision had been well surpassed, as Everyman's Library consisted of 994 titles published in 1,239 volumes.
  • Ex-Libris - a bookplate (or book-plate, as it was commonly styled until the early 20th century), also known as ex-libr?s (Latin for "from the books (or library) of"), is usually a small printed or decorative label pasted into a book, often on the front endpaper, to indicate ownership.
  • Explore 671,628 items digitized from The New York Public Library's collections. - The New York Public Library.
  • Fingerprint Bookmark Band - MoMA Design Store.
  • Five New Fashion Books For Your Coffee Table - The New York Times.
  • Forgotten Books - "Read free books online at Forgotten Books." 484,473 free books. Largest online eBooks library.
  • Frame Story - literary technique that sometimes serves as a companion piece to a story within a story, whereby an introductory or main narrative is presented, at least in part, for the purpose of setting the stage either for a more emphasized second narrative or for a set of shorter stories. The frame story leads readers from a first story into another, smaller one (or several ones) within it. The frame story may also be used to allow readers to understand a part of the story, then jump to another part that can now be understood.
  • FRANKLIN EBOOKMAN - designs, develops, publishes, and distributes globally innovative electronic language learning solutions on handheld devices, memory media cards. Also distributes more than 52,000 book titles in electronic format.
  • Getty Search Gateway - allows users to search across several of the Getty repositories, including collections databases, library catalogs, collection inventories, and archival finding aids.
  • Good Reads - "Share Book Recommendations With Your Friends, Join Book Clubs, Answer Trivia." Social cataloging website founded in December 2006 and launched in January 2007. The website allows individuals to freely search Goodreads' extensive user-populated database of books, annotations, and reviews. Users can sign up and register books to generate library catalogs and reading lists. They can also create their own groups of book suggestions and discussions.
  • GOOGLE BOOKS - a service from Google that searches the full text of books that Google scans.
  • greatest snobs in literary history - The Guardian.
  • The Grolier Club, 47 East 60th Street, New York, NY 10022, U.S.A.
  • Grolier Club - private club and society of bibliophiles in New York City. Founded in January 1884, it is the oldest existing bibliophilic club in North America. The Grolier Club maintains a research library specializing in books, bibliography and bibliophily, printing (especially the history of printing and examples of fine printing), binding, illustration and bookselling. The Grolier Club has one of the more extensive collections of book auction and bookseller catalogs in North America.
  • Gutenberg Bible - the first major book printed in the West using movable type. It marked the start of the "Gutenberg Revolution" and the age of the printed book in the West.
  • Gutenberg Museum Mainz - since 1900. "Experience the history of printing, writing, and books in the Gutenberg-Museum. The Gutenberg-Museum, which lies opposite the cathedral in the heart of the old part of Mainz, is one of the oldest museums of the book and printing in the world."
  • Hans P. Kraus - (1907-1988). Was an Austrian-born book dealer described as "without doubt the most successful and dominant rare book dealer in the world in the second half of the 20th century" and in a league with other rare book dealers such as Bernard Quaritch, Guillaume de Bure and A.S.W. Rosenbach.
  • Harold Robbins's cocaine-fuelled bonkbusters sold 750 million copies — and they're far better than Fifty Shades - The Telegraph.
  • HARPER COLLINS - founded in New York City in 1817. One of the world’s leading English-language publishers.
  • Hemingway code hero - sometimes more simply referred to as the Hemingway hero, is a stock character created by Ernest Hemingway. The character is easily identified by its strong masculinity, enthusiasm for life and often excessive indulgence in its pleasures. The code hero was embraced by readers in the 1920s as a kind of literary antidote to the increasingly sensitive, emasculated American male.
  • Here’s how your favorite classic novel made a computer feel - "Where big data meets high-school English class — plus Harry Potter."
  • How Switzerland inspired Frankenstein - The Telegraph.
  • HOW TECHNOLOGY SHAPES THE WAY WE READ - "The State of Reading: A Wired Investigation."
  • How the ‘brainy’ book became a publishing phenomenon - The Guardian.
  • HOW TO FIND A BOOK - Wikibooks.
  • How to get seriously good at reading - "Are you a slow reader? Or a fast reader? Either way, here's some tips to help you get better at reading - and take more in."
  • How to Get Your Mind to Read - The New York Times.
  • How to Share Books & Movies Through Amazon Household - "The retail giant offers a way to share your Prime benefits - including Kindle titles, audiobooks, and free shipping - with others in your home."
  • IAN FLEMING - official website for Ian Fleming, Ian Fleming Publications. Information on Ian Fleming books and James Bond.
  • Ibid. - Latin, short for ibidem, meaning "in the same place") is the term used to provide an endnote or footnote citation or reference for a source that was cited in the preceding endnote or footnote.
  • Iceberg Theory - (sometimes known as the "theory of omission") is a style of writing (turned colloquialism) coined by American writer Ernest Hemingway.
  • Idem - Id. (masculine and neuter) and ead. (feminine) (Latin, short for idem and eadem, "the same") denote the previously cited source (compare ibid.). Id. is particularly used in legal citations. They are also used in academic citations replacing the name of a repeated author.
  • ILAB | International League of Antiquarian Booksellers - 22 national associations and some 2000 rare booksellers in 32 countries under one roof.
  • Imprint - an imprint of a publisher is a trade name under which a work is published.
  • In the Footsteps of Marcel Proust - The New York Times.
  • Incunable - book, pamphlet, or broadside (such as the Almanach cracoviense ad annum 1474) that was printed—not handwritten—before the year 1501 in Europe.
  • Index Librorum Prohibitorum - ("List of Prohibited Books") was a list of publications deemed heretical or contrary to morality by the Sacred Congregation of the Index, and Catholics were forbidden to read them without permission.
  • INSIDE GOOGLE BOOKS - "Books of the world, stand up and be counted! All 129,864,880 of you."
  • INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE OF ANTIQUARIAN BOOKSELLERS | ILAB - "The World's Best Books, the World's Best Booksellers."
  • internet archive - since 1996. "As of February 2021, the Internet Archive holds over 29 million books and texts, 8.7 million movies, videos and TV shows, 629,000 software programs, 16 million audio files, 3.8 million images, 224,000 audio files, and 550 billion web pages in the Wayback Machine."
  • Internet Archive Book Images' Photostream - Flickr.
  • INTERNET BOOK DATABASE - online database with information about books and authors with an added social networking component. It currently contains information on over 300,000 books (over 910,000 ISBNs), 92,000 authors and 4,000 series making it one of the largest online databases of author and book information.
  • INTERNET BOOK LIST - online database with information about books, authors, and short stories.
  • INTERNET BOOK DATABASE OF FICTION - currently holds information for over 35,800 books and 4730 authors.
  • Irma Boom - Dutch graphic designer who specializes in book making. Boom has been described as 'The Queen of Books', having created over 300 books and is well reputed for her artistic autonomy within her field. Her bold experimental approach to her projects often challenges the convention of traditional books in both physical design and printed content.
  •   
  • ISBN | INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER - official site.
  • ISSN | INTERNATIONAL STANDARD SERIAL NUMBER - official site.
  • It was a dark and stormy night - often-mocked and parodied phrase[1] considered to represent "the archetypal example of a florid, melodramatic style of fiction writing", also known as purple prose.
  • Jane Austen: her 50 greatest characters - The Telegraph.
  • John Steinbeck was a sadistic womaniser, says wife in memoir - "Gwyn Conger Steinbeck’s newly unearthed book tells of troubled marriage to author."
  • Julian Fellowes Project, ‘Belgravia,’ Treads New Digital Ground - The New York Times.
  • Julian Fellowes’s BELGRAVIA - story in 11 episodes published week by week via an app in the tradition of Charles Dickens.
  • LCC | Library of Congress Classification - system of library classification developed by the Library of Congress (U.S.A.).
  • Library binding - method of binding serials, and re-binding paperback or hardcover books, for use within libraries. Library binding increases the durability of books, as well as making the materials easier to use.
  • library thing - "Catalog your books online." LibraryThing is an online service to help people catalog their books easily. You can access your catalog from anywhere—even on your mobile phone. Because everyone catalogs together, LibraryThing also connects people with the same books, comes up with suggestions for what to read next, and so forth.
  • LINOTYPE - download fonts from classic to cool.
  • LITERATURE - Wikipedia.
  • Literature Infographics - "A unique way to learn about the characters, themes, authors, and literary devices of your favorite books - visually!"
  • LIX - readability measure indicating the difficulty of reading a text.
  • Longform.org - since 2010. Recommends new and classic non-fiction from around the web. Articles can be read on a browser or saved to read later with Readability, Instapaper, Pocket or Kindle.
  • longueurs - a dull and tedious portion (as of a book).
  • Losing Yourself in a Good Book - The New York Times.
  • Ludvig Holberg’s Writings - "Ludvig Holberg (1684–1754) is one of the main figures of the Scandinavian Enlightenment. His numerous and multifaceted writings occupy a central position in the literature of both Denmark and Norway. This is the first digital critical edition of Holberg’s collected writings. The texts are fully searchable and equipped with commentaries, introductions, critical apparatus, and facsimiles."
  • Tea biscuit dunking is one of many examples of cues that can elicit involuntary memories, as evidenced by Marcel Proust.
  • MADELEINE MOMENT - involuntary autobiographical memory, is a subcomponent of memory that occurs when cues encountered in everyday life evoke recollections of the past without conscious effort.
  • MEMORY OF THE WORLD - UNESCO's programme aiming at preservation and dissemination of valuable archive holdings and library collections worldwide.
  • Miscellany - collection of various pieces of writing by different authors.
  • Most Overrated Books of All Time - Ranker.
  • Moving Wikipedia From Computer to Many, Many Bookshelves - The New York Times.
  • new book about Ferrari that costs as much as a car - CNN style.
  • Nielsen BookScan - since 2001. Data provider for the book publishing industry. BookScan compiles point of sale data for book sales.
  • Nothing but the truth: the legacy of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four - "Every generation turns to it in times of political turmoil, and this extract from a new book about the novel examines its relevance in the age of fake news and Trump."
  • OCLC | ONLINE COMPUTER LIBRARY CENTER - "The world's libraries. Connected." More than 27,000 libraries in 86 countries and territories use OCLC services to locate, acquire, catalog, lend and preserve library materials.
  • Octavo - an octavo is a book or pamphlet made up of one or more full sheets of (e.g. A2 paper) on which 16 pages of text were printed, which were then folded three times to produce eight leaves.
  • On the French Riviera, Fitzgerald Found His Place in the Sun - The New York Times.
  • Open Library.
  • Open Library - "Open Library is yours to borrow, read & browse." The World's classic literature at your fingertips. Over 1,000,000 free ebook titles available.
  • OXFORD LITERARY FESTIVAL
  • Oxford University Press Museum - "This small museum preserves and displays historic books, documents and printing equipment of the Oxford University Press."
  • PAPERBACK - Wikipedia.
  • PG Wodehouse: Why India still holds a flame for the English author - "PG Wodehouse, creator of Jeeves and Bertie Wooster, was the most English novelist imaginable. His comic world was old-fashioned well before he died 45 years ago - crammed with disapproving aunts in hats, eccentric aristocrats and wealthy young men about town getting into scrapes. But he has countless fans around the world - not least in India, a country Wodehouse never set foot in."
  • PICARESQUE NOVEL - Wikipedia.
  • Plagiarism software pins down new source for Shakespeare's plays - "Scholars say the likelihood of George North’s unpublished manuscript A Brief Discourse of Rebellion sharing words and features with the Bard’s plays by chance is ‘less than one in a billion’."
  • Polyglot (book) - book that contains side-by-side versions of the same text in several different languages. Some editions of the Bible or its parts are polyglots, in which the Hebrew and Greek originals are exhibited along with historical translations. Polyglots are useful for studying the history of the text and its interpretation.
  • Pretentious, impenetrable, hard work ... better? Why we need difficult books - "This year’s Booker-winner Milkman has been criticised for being challenging. But are we confusing readability with literary value?"
  • Print Wikipedia - "The entire English language Wikipedia in nearly 7,500 volumes."
  • Professional confessionals: why are memoirs about work topping the charts? - "From Adam Kay’s tales from the NHS to the Secret Barrister’s inside view of the justice system, readers are still gripped by what goes on in elite jobs."
  • Proust Ink.
  • Proust Ink - "A Website Celebrating the Life and Works of Marcel Proust." Join renowned Proust biographer William C. Carter as he guides you through In Search of Lost Time. Read the novel and enjoy the lectures on your own schedule. 30 multimedia lectures with reading assignments, supplementary files, & live webcams.
  • Public domain - works in the public domain are those whose intellectual property rights have expired, have been forfeited, or are inapplicable. Examples include the works of Shakespeare and Beethoven.
  • Public Domain Collections: Free to Share & Reuse - The New York Public Library.
  • Publisher wins rights to Voynich manuscript, a book no one can read - The Guardian.
  • Read by Famous - "From Their Hands To Yours." We sell books that were owned and read by people who have achieved high levels of recognition in their particular fields. Not copies of titles they have read, but the actual books that these people owned and read.
  • Rocambole - fictional adventurer created by Pierre Alexis Ponson du Terrail, a 19th-century French writer. The word rocambolesque has become common in French and other languages to label any kind of fantastic adventure.
  • Roman À Clef - definition & explanation.
  • Rowan Atkinson: why I just couldn't say no to Maigret - The Telegraph.
  • Sangorski & Sutcliffe.
  • Sangorski & Sutcliffe - firm of bookbinders established in London in 1901. It is considered to be one of the most important bookbinding companies of the 20th century, famous for its luxurious jeweled bindings that used real gold and precious stones in their book covers.
  • Shakespeare Documented - Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.
  • Shakespeare in Modern English? - The New York Times.
  • Shakespeare, the Book Tour - The New York Times.
  • Shakespeare timeline: follow the plot of the playwright's life - The Guardian.
  • Shakespeare's 400th anniversary: 'man of Stratford' to be celebrated in 2016 - The Guardian.
  • Shakespeare's grave to be radar scanned despite famous curse - The Telegraph.
  • Shakespeare's language not as original as dictionaries think - The Guardian.
  • Shakespeare's last act: a torrent of twisted fantasies - The Guardian.
  • SHVOONG.COM - "The Global Source for Summaries & Reviews". Shvoong is a global hub for Summaries & Reviews on virtually every topic imaginable. On Shvoong you’ll find book reviews, book summaries, movie reviews, website reviews, make money online reviews, business reviews, product reviews, travel reviews, and much more.
  • Skim reading is the new normal. The effect on society is profound - "When the reading brain skims texts, we don’t have time to grasp complexity, to understand another’s feelings or to perceive beauty. We need a new literacy for the digital age."
  • Solander box.
  • Solander box - book-form case used for storing manuscripts, maps, prints, documents, old and precious books, etc. It is commonly used in archives, print rooms and libraries.
  • Sorry, You Can’t Speed Read - The New York Times.
  • SPEED READING - definition & explanation.
  • Spritz Reinvents Reading on Mobile Devices - 500 words per minute.
  • Stalag fiction - short-lived genre of Nazi exploitation fiction from Israel that flourished in the 1950s and early 1960s, and stopped after the time of the Eichmann Trial, because of a ban by the Israeli government.
  • Stephen King, Not Just the Guy Who Makes Monsters - The New York Times.
  • Stolen-Book.org - database is for books reported stolen after 15th June 2010.
  • Storytelling - Wikipedia.
  • succès d'Éstime - success, as of a book, play, etc, based on the appreciation of the critics rather than popular acclaim.
  • Temples for the Literary Pilgrim - The New York Times.
  • Ten ways in which Shakespeare changed the world - The Guardian.
  • Test Your Book Smarts - The New York Times.
  • The American Mercury - American magazine published from 1924 to 1981. It was founded as the brainchild of H. L. Mencken and drama critic George Jean Nathan. The magazine featured writing by some of the most important writers in the United States through the 1920s and 1930s. After a change in ownership in the 1940s, the magazine attracted conservative writers.
  • The Big Read - survey on books carried out by the BBC in the United Kingdom in 2003, where over three quarters of a million votes were received from the British public to find the nation's best-loved novel of all time. The year-long survey was the biggest single test of public reading taste to date, and culminated with several programmes hosted by celebrities, advocating their favourite books.
  • The Book Collector - Summer 2015 issue.
  • The Book Collector - founded in 1952 by Ian Fleming. Published quarterly. Online resource: a place where librarians, book collectors and booksellers meet. "The only journal in the world that deals with book collecting, but it is much more than that – a bridge that joins together collectors, librarians and booksellers, and all who are interested in books, to have, to read, to enjoy in any way."
  • The Coming Shakespeare Extravaganza - 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death.
  • THE DIGITAL DEAD SEA SCROLLS - in partnership with Google.
  • THE INTERNET SPECULATIVE FICTION DATABASE - database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction.
  • The man who made Shakespeare famous - The Telegraph.
  • The Most Famous Photograph of Poets Ever Taken - "This 1948 photo is a portrait of an era in American poetry - both for whom it includes and for whom it left out." The photograph was published in Life magazine and immediately became iconic. Andy Warhol saved a copy of it. In the New York Times, Michiko Kakutani called it “one of the most remarkable gatherings” of poets in the 20th century. It’s been reprinted in magazines, newspapers, and biographies. It is an extraordinary portrait of American poetry and literature at the end of World War II - both for whom it includes and for whom it leaves out.
  • THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF WRITING (NAW) - "A new start for talented writers." (UK).
  • The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard - "Advantages of Longhand Over Laptop Note Taking."
  • the Renaissance printer who brought porn to Europe - The Guardian.
  • The Roxburghe Club.
  • The Roxburghe Club - since 1812. Exclusive bibliophilic and publishing society. The Club has had a total of 344 members since its foundation. The circle has always been an exclusive one, with just one "black ball" (negative vote) being enough to exclude an applicant. Since 1839 the number of members at any one time has been limited to forty.
  • the secret life of an Amazon reviewer - The Guardian.
  • THE SHAKESPEARE CENTRE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVE - at The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, Stratford-upon-Avon.
  • The single most valuable writing skill - "How mastering this will make your writing compelling and authoritative."
  • The Strange Triumph of "The Little Prince" - The New Yorker.
  • Top 10 end-of-the-world novels - from Ballard to Pratchett - "Fresh from writing his own first sci-fi thriller, physicist and broadcaster Jim Al-Khalili chooses favourite books that tackle the Earth in peril."
  • Top 50 Richest Authors - Celebrity Net Worth.
  • Top writers choose their perfect crime novel - The Guardian.
  • Trust no one: how Le CarrÉ's Little Drummer Girl predicted our dangerous world - "Secret interrogations, elaborately staged deceptions, conspiracies and murder ... John le Carré’s murky spy thriller could not be more relevant."
  • Tsundoku - the condition of acquiring reading materials but letting them pile up in one's home without reading them.
  • TYPEFACES - definition & explanation.
  • UBUWEB - a completely independent resource dedicated to all strains of the avant-garde, ethnopoetics, and outsider arts.
  • VANITY PRESS - Wikipedia.
  • Vatican's Secret Archives no longer officially secret after renaming - "Pope says new name for trove of priceless papers will be the Vatican Apostolic Archives."
  • Voynich manuscript - illustrated codex hand-written in an unknown writing system. The vellum on which it is written has been carbon-dated to the early 15th century (1404–1438), and it may have been composed in Italy during the Italian Renaissance. The manuscript is named after Wilfrid Voynich, a Polish-Samogitian book dealer who purchased it in 1912.
  • Wattpad - since 2006. Writing community in which users are able to post articles, stories, fan fiction, and poems, either through the website or the mobile app. This gives people the chance to have their creative works available to a wider audience. The content includes work by undiscovered writers, published writers, new writers, with all users being given an equal chance to write popular works.
  • We Are What We Read - The New York Times.
  • What travel writers are reading right now - "Tim Ecott asks fellow travel writers which books are helping them to spread their wings and escape the lockdown – in their imaginations at least."
  • What's in a phrase? Shakespeare probably - The Telegraph.
  • Why Harper Lee Struggled to Write Again After To Kill a Mockingbird - TIME Magazine.
  • Why Julian Fellowes's new app Belgravia won't start a revolution - The Telegraph.
  • WHY SO MANY FANTASY NOVELS ARE OBSESSED WITH ACADEMIA - "THE BEST FANTASY debut of 2018 has a problem. It was also the best fantasy debut of 2009. And 2007. And 1997, 1985, 1982, and 1968."
  • Why There’s No ‘Millennial’ Novel - The New York Times.
  • why thrillers are leaving other books for dead - The Guardian.
  • Why we should be worried about Amazon's real-life bookshops - The Guardian.
  • Why You Should Start Binge-Reading Right Now - "Ditch Netflix for a novel. And not just because a novelist is telling you to."
  • WILLIAM MORRIS AGENCY - a talent & literary agency.
  • WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE - complete works free online.
  • William Shakespeare, Playwright & Poet, Is Dead at 52 - The New York Times.
  • William Shakespeare’s father's shady dealings helped to fund son’s plays - The New York Times.
  • Would American Psycho be published today? How shocking books have changed with their readers - "Do disturbing novels reflect an extreme reality or are they just titillation? Hanya Yanagihara, Leïla Slimani and others on why they set out to shock us."
  • WORLD BOOK DAY - designated by UNESCO as a worldwide celebration of books and reading.
  • WORLD'S MOST EXPENSIVE BOOK - The Birds of America by John James Audubon sold at Sotheby's auction on December 7, 2010 for GBP7,321,250.
  • WorldCat - "The World's Largest Library Catalog." WorldCat is the world's largest network of library content and services. WorldCat libraries are dedicated to providing access to their resources on the Web, where most people start their search for information.
  • Writer's home - locations where writers lived. Frequently, these homes are preserved as historic house museums and literary tourism destinations, called writer's home museums, especially when the homes are those of famous literary figures.
  • You Could Soon Read An Entire Harry Potter Book In Under 90 Minutes With This App - The Huffington Post.
  • You May Soon Binge Books Just Like You Binge Netflix - Wired.
  • Zisska & Schauer - since 1893. Munich, Germany. International specialists in rare antiquarian books and prints.
  • Audiobooks
  • Innovo Publishing.
  • AUDIOBOOK - Wikipedia.
    • 224 Places For Free Audio Books Online - Gizmo's Freeware.
    • 550 FREE AUDIO BOOKS - Open Culture.
    • AMAZON.COM: DOWNLOADABLE AUDIOBOOKS - as of October 23, 2014: 121,203 titles.
    • AUDIBLE.COM - "Listen to a Best Seller on your iPod or MP3 player!" Provider of spoken audio entertainment, information, and educational programming. Audible sells audiobooks, radio and TV programs, and audio versions of magazines and newspapers.
    • Audiobooks on the App Store on iTunes - Apple.
    • AUDIOBOOKS.NET - "Stream and Download Audiobooks to your iPhone, iPad, Android, or PC. Get a Free Audiobook!""
    • AUDIOBOOKS.ORG - "Free Audio Books."
    • AUDIOBOOKSFORFREE.COM - "MP3, iPOD and DVD audiobooks (adventures, detectives, horrors, classics, children, non-fictions, philosophy, etc.) for you to download and enjoy."
    • Downpour - "Browse our audio book downloads, get free shipping and discounts of 30% off audio books on CD, or join our audiobook club for even more savings."
    • FREE CLASSIC AUDIOBOOKS - "Digital Narration for the 21st Century."
    • Hoopla Digital - "Enjoy thousands of movies, TV shows, videos, music and audiobooks that library card holders can borrow from their public library."
    • LIBRIVOX - "Free public domain audiobooks." LibriVox audiobooks are free for anyone to listen to, on their computers, iPods or other mobile device, or to burn onto a CD.
    • Loyal Books - "7,000+ Free Audio Books & eBooks Downloads."
    • OPEN CULTURE - "The best free cultural & educational media on the web." Download 550 great books for free.
    • OverDrive - "eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries." OverDrive libraries add to their collections from a catalog of over 2 million eBooks, audiobooks, and videos. Start exploring to see what's out there.
    • Project Gutenberg - "Browse By Category: Audio Book, human-read."
    • Scribd - "Scribd Selects Audio. Hand-picked favorites from our editors. Browse scribd selects audio· Top Audiobooks. What's trending, bestsellers, award-winners & more."
    • THE GREAT COURSES - Audio & Video Lectures from The World's Best Professors - Amazon.com. As of October 23, 2014 the company offers more than 1,545 courses, which span more than 10,000 hours of content across several subject categories: business and economics, fine arts, music, ancient and medieval history, modern history, literature and English language, philosophy and intellectual history, religion, science, mathematics, social sciences, and better living.
    Authors
  • Autor writing.
  • Ian Fleming & James Bond Resources (400+) Top 200 Crime, Mystery & Thriller Writers: A-Z
  • 50 best TV detectives and sleuths - The Telegraph.
  • Alexander Litvinenko: the man who solved his own murder - The Guardian.
  • AUTHOR - Wikipedia.
  • Bouchercon - annual convention of creators and devotees of mystery and detective fiction. It is named in honour of writer, reviewer, and editor Anthony Boucher; also the inspiration for the Anthony Awards, which have been issued at the convention since 1986.
  • City mysteries - 19th-century genre of popular novel, in which characters explore the secret underworlds of cities and reveal corruption and exploitation, depicting violence and deviant sexuality. They were popular in both Europe & the United States.
  • CLASSIC LITERATURE LIBRARY - free public domain ebooks and classic books.
  • Crime dramas are often set in English villages because they are places of 'hatred, mistrust and bitterness' - The Telegraph.
  • CRIME FICTION - the genre of fiction that deals with crimes, their detection, criminals and their motives.
  • CRIME WRITERS' ASSOCIATION - writers' association in the United Kingdom founded in 1953.
  • CRYPTO MUSEUM - "At present we are a virtual museum in The Netherlands, that can only be visited on the internet. We do, however, regularly organize exhibitions in co-operation with other museums."
  • Detection Club - formed in 1930 by a group of British mystery writers.
  • Do you have what it takes to be a secret agent - The Telegraph.
  • Domestic Noir - literary subgenre within crime fiction.
  • Edgar Allan Poe: the master of horror writing - The Telegraph.
  • ELEMENTARY, MY DEAR WATSON - origin of the phrase.
  • Gentleman thief - definition & explanation.
  • Golden Age of Detective Fiction - Wikipedia.
  • GOOD COP / BAD COP - definition & explanation.
  • Graham Greene: 'The Battle of Britain was won on Benzedrine' - The Telegraph.
  • Had I but known - a form of prolepsis or foreshadowing that hints at some looming disaster in which the first-person narrator laments his or her course of action which precipitates some or other unfortunate series of actions.
  • Hemingway code hero - sometimes more simply referred to as the Hemingway hero, is a stock character created by Ernest Hemingway. The character is easily identified by its strong masculinity, enthusiasm for life and often excessive indulgence in its pleasures. The code hero was embraced by readers in the 1920s as a kind of literary antidote to the increasingly sensitive, emasculated American male.
  • Historical mystery - or historical whodunit is a subgenre of two literary genres, historical fiction and mystery fiction. These works are set in a time period considered historical from the author's perspective, and the central plot involves the solving of a mystery or crime (usually murder).
  • History of crime fiction - Wikipedia.
  • Hostile Witness - witness at trial whose testimony on direct examination is either openly antagonistic or appears to be contrary to the legal position of the party who called the witness.
  • How maths can solve Agatha Christie's whodunnits - Daily Mail.
  • howcatchem - is a murder mystery fiction structure in which the commission of the crime is shown or described at the beginning, usually including the identity of the perpetrator.
  • IC Codes - codes used by the British police in radio communications to describe the apparent ethnicity of a suspect.
  • In the Footsteps of Marcel Proust - The New York Times.
  • INVERTED DETECTIVE STORY - also known as a "howcatchem", is a murder mystery fiction structure in which the commission of the crime is shown or described at the beginning, usually including the identity of the perpetrator.
  • Jack the Ripper identity: mystery ‘solved’ in new book - The Telegraph.
  • Jane Austen: her 50 greatest characters - The Telegraph.
  • John le CarrÉ: I was beaten by my father, abandoned by my mother - The Guardian.
  • Kim Philby, Lecturing in East Berlin in ‘81, Bragged of How Easy It Was to Fool MI6 - The New York Times.
  • Legal drama - Wikipedia.
  • LIST OF CRIME WRITERS - Wikipedia.
  • LIST OF EUROPEAN MYSTERY WRITERS - Wikipedia.
  • LIST OF THRILLER WRITERS - Wikipedia.
  • Locard's exchange principle - holds that the perpetrator of a crime will bring something into the crime scene and leave with something from it, and that both can be used as forensic evidence. Dr. Edmond Locard (13 December 1877 – 4 May 1966) was a pioneer in forensic science who became known as the Sherlock Holmes of France. He formulated the basic principle of forensic science: "Every contact leaves a trace".
  • Locked room mystery - sub-genre of detective fiction in which a crime—almost always murder—is committed under apparently impossible circumstances. The crime in question typically involves a crime scene that no intruder could have entered or left, e.g., a locked room. Following other conventions of classic detective fiction, the reader is normally presented with the puzzle and all of the clues, and is encouraged to solve the mystery before the solution is revealed in a dramatic climax.
  • My Al Capone Museum - "Now with over 130 web pages and 3385 images!" Photographs and stories about several of Capone's personal items as well as related documents, articles, and merchandise.
  • Mystery Readers International - fan/reader organization open to all readers, fans, critics, editors, publishers, and writers of Mystery fiction.
  • MYSTERY STORY - Detective fiction is a branch of crime fiction in which a detective, either professional or amateur, investigates a crime, often murder.
  • MYSTERY WRITERS OF AMERICA - the premier organization for mystery and crime writers, professionals allied to the crime writing field, aspiring crime writers, and folks who just love to read crime fiction.
  • Naming Jack the Ripper: The Biggest Forensic Breakthrough Since 1888 - Amazon.com.
  • opposite number - a person who holds a position in an organization or system corresponding to that of a person in another organization or system; a counterpart.
  • Perry Mason moment - In court proceedings in the United States, a Perry Mason moment is said to have occurred whenever information is unexpectedly (to most present), and often dramatically, introduced into the record that changes the perception of the proceedings greatly and often influences the outcome. Often it takes the form of a witness's answer to a question, but it can sometimes come in the form of new evidence.
  • Pipe dreams: on the trail of Maigret’s Paris - The Guardian.
  • PEN International - worldwide association of writers, founded in London in 1921 to promote friendship and intellectual co-operation among writers everywhere. The association has autonomous International PEN centers in over 100 countries.
  • Plagiarism software pins down new source for Shakespeare's plays - "Scholars say the likelihood of George North’s unpublished manuscript A Brief Discourse of Rebellion sharing words and features with the Bard’s plays by chance is ‘less than one in a billion’."
  • POLICE PROCEDURAL MYSTERY STORY - a sub-genre of the mystery story which attempts to convincingly depict the activities of a police force as they investigate crimes.
  • Private eye - from private investigator and its abbreviation P.I., through the homophonic term eye in place of "I", and the used of eye as a reference to survellience.
  • PRIVATE EYE WRITERS OF AMERICA
  • Professor Challenger - fictional character in a series of fantasy and science fiction stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.
  • Psychological thriller - Wikipedia.
  • Red herring - something that misleads or distracts from a relevant or important issue. It may be either a logical fallacy or a literary device that leads readers or audiences towards a false conclusion.
  • Rocambole - fictional adventurer created by Pierre Alexis Ponson du Terrail, a 19th-century French writer. The word rocambolesque has become common in French and other languages to label any kind of fantastic adventure.
  • Rose Line - fictional name given to the Paris Meridian popularized by Dan Brown in his 2003 novel, The Da Vinci Code.
  • Sisters in Crime - organization that has 3,600 members in 48 chapters world-wide, offering networking, advice and support to mystery authors. Members are authors, readers, publishers, agents, booksellers and librarians bound by their affection for the mystery genre and their support of women who write mysteries.
  • Spy fiction - Wikipedia.
  • STRAND MAGAZINE - "The magazine for mystery & short story lovers."
  • The Baker Street Journal - since 1946. "The premier publication of scholarship about Sherlock Holmes." 'An Irregular quarterly' of Sherlockiana, published by the Baker Street Irregulars.
  • The Booksellers - 2019 American documentary film that was directed, edited, and produced by D.W. Young. It was also executive produced by Parker Posey, who provides narration in the film. The film explores the world of antiquarian and rare book dealers and their bookstores. It focuses primarily on booksellers in New York City, including Adina Cohen, Naomi Hample and Judith Lowry, the three sisters of the Argosy Book Store, Stephen Massey, founder of Christie’s NY Book Department, and Nancy Bass Wyden, owner of the Strand Bookstore. Other prominent people featured in the film include Fran Lebowitz, Gay Talese, Justin Croft, Zack Hample, Susan Orlean, William S. Reese, A. S. W. Rosenbach, Jay S. Walker, and Kevin Young.
  • THE BUTLER DID IT - definition & explanation.
  • THE CAMBRIDGE FIVE - a ring of spies in the UK who passed information to the Soviet Union during World War II and into the early 1950s.
  • The many lives of John le CarrÉ, in his own words - The Guardian.
  • THE MYSTERIOUS BOOKSHOP - "The World's Finest Mystery Specialty Store. Offering the best in Mystery, Crime, Suspense, Espionage & Detective Fiction." New York City, NY, U.S.A.
  • The single most valuable writing skill - "How mastering this will make your writing compelling and authoritative."
  • The World’s Greatest Detective - The New York Times.
  • THRILLER - definition & explanation.
  • Top 100 Crime Novels of All Time - Wikipedia.
  • Tozai Mystery Best 100 - "The Top 100 Mystery Novels of the East and the West."
  • True crime - is a non-fiction literary and film genre in which the author examines an actual crime and details the actions of real people.
  • True Detective - (1924-1995). Considered the first true crime magazine.
  • Where Dracula Was Born, and It’s Not Transylvania
  • Whodunit - (for "Who['s] done it?") is a complex, plot-driven variety of the detective story in which the puzzle is the main feature of interest.
  • William Gillette - (1853-1937). American actor, playwright and stage-manager in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He is best remembered for portraying Sherlock Holmes on stage and in a 1916 silent film long thought lost. Gillette's most significant contributions to the theater were in devising realistic stage settings and special sound and lighting effects, and as an actor in putting forth what he called the "Illusion of the First Time". His portrayal of Holmes helped create the modern image of the detective.
  • WRITER - Wikipedia.
  • Ian Fleming & James Bond Resources
  • The 14 James Bond NOVELS & SHORT STORIES written by Ian Fleming by publication sequence: Casino Royale (1953), Live and Let Die (1954), Moonraker (1955), Diamonds Are Forever (1956), From Russia, with Love (1957), Dr. No (1958), Goldfinger (1959), For Your Eyes Only (collection of short stories - 1960), Thunderball (1961), The Spy Who Loved Me (1962), On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1963), You Only Live Twice (1964), The Man with the Golden Gun (1965), Octopussy and The Living Daylights (1966).
  • 007 - "The Official James Bond 007 Website."
  • 007 - "The name's Bond. James Bond."
  • 007 collector
  • 007 INSPIRED COCKTAILS & DRINKS - à la James Bond.
  • 007 James - "Who Played James Bond: A Complete History."
  • 007 Magazine - "For James Bond Lovers Only!" Purchased worldwide since 1979.
  • 007 Ways to Buy James Bond 1st Editions.
  • 007 Ways to Buy James Bond 1st Editions - Artistic License Renewed.
  • Letterhead for Ian Fleming's private London office.
  • 4, Old Mitre Court, Fleet Street, E.C.4 - letterhead for Ian Fleming's private London office.
  • 16 Victoria Square, London SW1W 0RA, England, U.K.
  • 16 Victoria Square, London SW1 - terraced house, leasehold, 4 beds, 4 baths, 3 receps. The home of Ian Fleming from 1953 until his death in 1964. Value (2014): £3,750,000.
  • 22b Ebury Street, Belgravia, London SW1W 0LU, England, U.K.
  • 22b Ebury Street, Belgravia, London - Ian Fleming bought a flat from the fascist leader Oswald Mosley in 1934 and lived here until 1945. Moonraker villain Sir Hugo Drax also lived in this flat and Bond chased him down Ebury Street, all the way to Dover! This building was constructed in 1830 as a Baptist church but is now divided into several flats. Value (2014): £3,895,000.
  • 23 St Margaret's Bay, Dover, Kent CT15 6AG, England, U.K.
  • 23 St Margaret's Bay, Dover, Kent - Ian Fleming bought the house from his friend Noël Coward in 1951.
  • 50 Years of Bond Villains - International Spy Museum.
  • 50 Years of James Bond - LIFE Books.
  • 360°-Restaurant Piz Gloria, Schilthorn Cableway Ltd., CH-3825 Mürren.
  • 360°-Restaurant Piz Gloria - "The world's first revolving restaurant." Originated in Ian Fleming's James Bond novel On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1963), wherein the hideout of the villain, Ernst Stavro Blofeld, is Piz Gloria, a mountain-top building containing an allergies investigation clinic. The movie production team found the restaurant partly constructed, and financially contributed to its completion in return for exclusive use for filming the movie (released in 1969), where the building is shown quite prominently. Afterwards, the restaurant retained the Piz Gloria name of the film location, and currently acknowledges the film's significant contribution to its commercial reputation; it features a James Bond exhibition, containing memorabilia and film clips, in the lower floor.
  • ABSOLUTELY JAMES BOND - fan site.
  • James Bond 007 - Intro sequence collage from 1962-2006: You Tube 7:25.
  • All James Bond Trailers - YouTube 1:01:24.
  • Ann Fleming (1913-1981) - 'Why it was Ian Fleming's wife who invented James Bond'.
  • ANN FLEMING - (1913-1981). Married Ian Fleming on March 24, 1952. The very next day, he sat down and began writing Casino Royale.
  • Artistic License Renewed - "An Art and Literary James Bond Blog and Tribute to Richard Chopping."
  • James Bond's 1964 Aston Martin DB5.
  • ASTON MARTIN DB5 - James Bond's 1964 Aston Martin sold at RM Auctions on October 27, 2010 for £2.912.000.
  • Aston Martin DB10 (2015-).
  • ASTON MARTIN DB10 - (2015-). Two-door coupé built by the British car manufacturer Aston Martin. The car was unveiled by director Sam Mendes and producer Barbara Broccoli as part of the official press launch of the film Spectre.
  • BEING JAMES BOND - "If James Bond can do it... YOU can do it!"
  • Sean Connery being fitted for his James Bond suit at Benson, Perry & Whitley, 9 Cork Street, London W1, England, U.K.
  • Benson, Perry & Whitley - 9 Cork Street, London W1 (now defunct). James Bond-author Ian Fleming's preferred off-Savile Row tailor.
  • Birds of the West Indies (ISBN 0-618-00210-3).
  • Birds of the West Indies - book containing exhaustive coverage of the 400+ species of birds found in the Caribbean Sea, excluding the ABC islands, and Trinidad and Tobago, which are considered bio-geographically as part of South America. Written by ornithologist James Bond, the book was first published in 1936 by the Academy of Natural Sciences. His name was appropriated by writer Ian Fleming, who was a keen bird watcher, for his fictional spy, James Bond.
  • BLADES CLUB - fictional London gentlemen's club appearing and referenced in several of Ian Fleming’s James Bond novels, most notably Moonraker. Blades was founded between 1774 and 1776 and is of a caliber equal to or greater than that of any other club. Blades is situated on “Park Street” (correct name Park Place) off of St James's Street, at the approximate location of the real-life club Pratt's. Based on Fleming’s notes as well as details of the club included in the novels, Blades is an amalgam of several nearby clubs, several of which Fleming mentions by name in various Bond books. These include Boodle's, The Portland Club, White's and Brooks's.
  • Bollinger champagnes.
  • BOLLINGER - founded in 1829. James Bond's favorites: RD and La Grande Année.
  • BOLLINGER 002 for 007 - limited edition of 30,000 bottles of La Grande Année 2002 James Bond special edition for the 007 film Skyfall.
  • BOND LIFESTYLE - founded in October 2005. The second most visited Bond website in the world. "The Real Thing". Clothes, gadgets, guns, cars and lifestyle in the James Bond movies and novels.
  • BOND LIFESTYLE AUCTIONS - James Bond memorabilia, and more.
  • Bond related websites - Bond Lifestyle.
  • BONDMOVIES.COM - "The James Bond Movies."
  • BONDTOYS.DE
  • Boodle's, 28 St James's Street, London SW1A 1HJ, England, U.K.
  • BOODLE'S - private members' club founded in 1762. 28 St James's Street, London. Founded by Lord Shelburne the future Marquess of Lansdowne and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, and the club came to be known after the name of its head waiter Edward Boodle. Boodle's is regarded as one of the most prestigious clubs in London, and counts many British aristocrats and notable politicians among its members. It is the second oldest club in the world, with only White's being older. Ian Fleming is said to have based the Blades Club from his James Bond novels on Boodle's. However, Boodle's itself is referenced in the novels Moonraker and You Only Live Twice.
  • Charles Fraser-Smith (1904-1992) - 'Mr. Gadget For James Bond Tales'.
  • Charles Fraser-Smith - (1904-1992). Widely credited as being the inspiration for Ian Fleming's James Bond quartermaster Q.
  • COMMANDERBOND.NET - "Bond At Its Best."
  • Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond - BBC America miniseries detailing the military career of James Bond creator Ian Fleming (29 January 2014 – 19 February 2014).
  • Floris No. 89.
  • FLORIS NO. 89 - quintessentially English gentleman's fragrance. Favored by James Bond-author Ian Fleming.
  • FROM SWEDEN WITH LOVE - Scandinavia's most comprehensive James Bond and Ian Fleming website featuring the novels and movies with the Swedish 'Bond girls' Britt Ekland, Maud Adams, Mary Stavin, Kristina Wayborn och Izabella Scorupco.
  • Court Hairdresser & Perfurmer Geo. F. Trumper, 9 Curzon Street, London W1J 5HQ, England, U.K.
  • Geo. F. Trumper - Gentlemen's Hairdresser, The Mayfair Shop, 9 Curzon Street, London W1J 5HQ, U.K. "London's Favourite barber, hairdresser and perfumer since 1875. Geo. F. Trumper is recognised as the finest traditional gentlemen's barber in London and is known throughout the world for its matchless range of gentlemen's fragrances and grooming products." Ian Fleming bought his hair care products here.
  • The late Ian Fleming's estate Goldeneye in Oracabessa, St. Mary, Jamaica.
  • Goldeneye - Fleming Villa - the late Ian Fleming's estate in Oracabessa, Jamaica. Rents for US$6,600 per night.
  • Goldeneye Hotel & Resort, Oracabessa, St. Mary, Jamaica.
  • GOLDENEYE Hotel & RESORT - of Ian Fleming / James Bond fame.
  • Wing Commander Forest Frederick Edward 'Tommy' Yeo-Thomas (1902-1964).
  • Historian reveals the Second World War hero who inspired the creation of James Bond - The Telegraph.
  • Ian Fleming (1908-1964).
  • IAN FLEMING - 1908-1964. English author, journalist and naval intelligence officer, best known for his James Bond series of spy novels.
  • Ian Fleming: Book collector.
  • Ian Fleming - as book collector.
  • Ian Fleming and the World of James Bond - Lilly Library, Indiana University. The James Bond novels and their manuscripts.
  • Ian Fleming International Airport, Ocho Rios, Jamaica.
  • Ian Fleming International Airport | OCJ | MKBS - airport located in Boscobel, Saint Mary Parish, Jamaica, 10 km (6.2 mi) east of Ocho Rios, in northern Jamaica. The airport provides service to the United States and to other Caribbean islands. It is named for Ian Fleming, the creator of the James Bond novels, whose Goldeneye estate is located in St Mary parish.
  • IAN FLEMING - The Times Obituary - August 13, 1964. Ian Fleming died from a heart attack, on Aug. 12, 1964.
  • Ian Fleming Walking Tours – City of London
  • Ian Fleming's Grave - Ian Fleming was buried on August 15, 1964 at Sevenhampton in St James parish churchyard.
  • Ian Fleming's James Bond Letters - Amazon.com.
  • Ivar Bryce (1906-1985) & Ian Fleming (1908-1964).
  • Ivar Bryce - (1906-1985). Ian Fleming named his James Bond character’s CIA agent friend after Ivar Bryce’s middle name, Felix. His surname was named after another of Fleming’s friends, Tommy Leiter.
  • JAMES BOND - Ian Fleming Publications.
  • James Bond (ornithologist) - the 'real' James Bond.
  • JAMES BOND - ornithologist (1900-1989). Leading American ornithologist, an expert on the birds of the Caribbean. His name was appropriated by writer Ian Fleming for his fictional spy, James Bond. Ian Fleming, who was a keen bird watcher living in Jamaica, was familiar with Bond's book, and chose the name of its author for the hero of Casino Royale in 1953, apparently because he wanted a name that sounded "as ordinary as possible". Fleming wrote to the real Bond's wife, "It struck me that this brief, unromantic, Anglo-Saxon and yet very masculine name was just what I needed, and so a second James Bond was born." He also contacted the real James Bond about using his name in the books, and Bond replied to him, "Fine with it."
  • JAMES BOND - Wikipedia.
  • James Bond 007 Car List - Specifications and Statistics.
  • James Bond 007 Men's Fragrance.
  • JAMES BOND 007 FRAGRANCE - the official James Bond 007 fragrance for men.
  • JAMES BOND 007 MUSEUM - Nybro, Sweden.
  • James Bond Books At Amazon.com - 7,677 Results.
  • JAMES BOND (Character) - on IMDb | Internet Movie Database.
  • JAMES BOND Fan Book - James Bond links.
  • James Bond 007 GoldenEye watch.
  • JAMES BOND GADGET WATCH HISTORY - Watchismo Times.
  • James Bond: How his sex life compares with an average man - BBC.
  • JAMES BOND Memes - "The blog that explores the ideas and influences in the James Bond books and films, Bond memes in popular culture, and the cultural impact of the Bond phenomenon."
  • James Bond Movies at Amazon.com - 672 results as of February 2, 2014.
  • JAMES BOND NOVELS BY IAN FLEMING AT AMAZON.COM - 523 results as of February 2, 2014.
  • JAMES BOND MULTIMEDIA - "Your source to get James Bond images of the Bond girls, cars, gadgets, locations, James Bond 007 and so much more!"
  • James Bond music - the James Bond film series from Eon Productions has had numerous signature tracks over the years, many of which are now considered classic pieces of film music. The best known of these pieces of music is the ubiquitous James Bond Theme.
  • JAMES BOND NEDERLAND - "Celebrating 50 years of James Bond."
  • JAMES BOND PRODUCT PLACEMENT - over 50 years of financing the film franchise through product placement.
  • The James Bond's Theme.
  • JAMES BOND Theme - the main signature theme of the James Bond films and has featured in every Eon Productions Bond film since Dr. No, released in 1962. The piece has been used as an accompanying fanfare to the gun barrel sequence in almost every James Bond film.
  • JAMES BOND WATCHES - "Dedicated focus on all things related to the wristwatches of James Bond, Agent 007, created by Ian Fleming and brought to film by Albert R. Broccoli's EON Productions."
  • JAMES BOND WIKI - a community fansite on James Bond. Check out Bond Girls, movie trailers, Quantum of Solace news, posters, DVDs, James Bond quotes.
  • James Bond's 1964 Aston Martin DB5.
  • James Bond's 1964 Aston Martin DB5 - sold on Wednesday, October 27, 2010 at RM Auctions for £2.912.000.
  • JAMES BOND's London - BBC Travel.
  • Lock & Co. Hatters James Bond Trilby Hat: £199.
  • James Bond's Trilby hat - the hat that Sean Connery wears in the first James Bond movies is still available at the original store: Lock & Co Hatters, founded in 1676. 6 St. James's Street, London, SW1A 1EF, England, U.K. The oldest hatters in the world.
  • James Bond's Weekly alcohol consumption - study by British Medical Journal.
  • Jane Bond - "I spy 007 actors perfect for the role."
  • KINA LILLET - used with James Bond's Vodka Martini.
  • LICENSED TO KILL - "The Ultimate James Bond Resource."
  • Ian Fleming on the cover of LIFE magazine, 7 October 1966.
  • LIFE Magazine - Ian Fleming on the cover of LIFE magazine, 7 October 1966 and the full article by John Pearson on pages 102-118: "James Bond's life often matches the real life of his creator Ian Fleming."
  • List of James Bond films - Wikipedia.
  • List of James Bond novels and short stories - Wikipedia.
  • List of James Bond vehicles - Wikipedia.
  • Literary 007 - "The Literary 007 James Bond Online Magazine and Tribute to Richard Chopping."
  • The Lotus Esprit S1 submarine car from the film is The Spy Who Loved Me (1977).
  • Lotus Esprit S1 - (1976-1978). Best known for its unique feature of converting into a submarine in the James Bond movie The Spy Who Loved Me (1977), also fondly referred to as 'Wet Nellie'.
  • MARLOW POKER CHIPS - "The Casino Royal plaques, made by Matsui, are the highest quality available, and are close reproductions of those used in the James Bond Casino Royale movie. The $500k plaque is 85x65mm & the $1m is 95x66mm. The Casino Royale chips, made by Carta Mundi, are the exact same chips that were used in the movie. These are high quality 14g chips."
  • MI6 - "The Home Of James Bond."
  • Monty Norman - singer and film composer best known for composing "The James Bond Theme".
  • Handmade Morland Specials cigarettes with no filter and triple gold band smoked by Ian Fleming & James Bond.
  • Morland & Co. - 83 Grosvenor Street / New Bond Street, London W1 (now defunct). Miss Cohen of Morland & Co. had a standing order to send Ian Fleming 300 handmade cigarettes on Friday night each week at a price of 37s 6d per hundred (1963). The cigarettes themselves were of regular length, not kingsize, and unfiltered, naturally. The name Morland never appeared. Instead, they had three gold rings at one end and, along the edge, in tiny capitals, the word 'HANDMADE'. Each box contained a slip of paper which read: "These cigarettes are made of the most choice and perfectly blended tobaccos, the dormant fragrance of which is preserved in our careful process of manufacture. Each cigarette is made by hand, one by one, and tobacco dust, so harmful to the throat is entirely eliminated."
  • Muriel Wright (1909-1944) - 'The Inspiration for Ian Fleming's James Bond Girls'.
  • Muriel Wright - (1909-1944). The inspiration for Ian Fleming's James Bond girls.
  • ON THE TRACKS OF 007 - "A field guide to the exotic James Bond filming locations around the world."
  • Patrick Dalzel-Job (1913-2003).
  • Patrick Dalzel-Job - (1913-2003). Distinguished British Naval Intelligence Officer and Commando of World War II. He was also an accomplished linguist, author, mariner, navigator, parachutist, diver and skier. Widely acclaimed as one of the main inspirations for James Bond, Ian Fleming's fictional character.
  • Persol sunglasses.
  • PERSOL - favored by movie actor Steve McQueen. James Bond's favorite sunglasses in Casino Royale: models 2244 & 2720.
  • The Playboy Interview: Ian Fleming. December 1964.
  • Playboy Interview - Ian Fleming. December 1964.
  • Robert Hamilton ("R.H.") Bruce Lockhart - (2 September 1887 – 27 February 1970), was a journalist, author, secret agent, British diplomat (Moscow, Prague), and footballer. His 1932 book, Memoirs of a British Agent, became an international best-seller, and brought him to the world's attention. One of the main inspirations for James Bond, Ian Fleming's fictional character.
  • Royal St. George's Golf Club, Sandwich, Kent CT13 9PB, England, U.K.
  • Royal St. George's Golf Club - Sandwich, Kent. Since 1887. One of the premier golf clubs in the United Kingdom, and one of the courses on The Open Championship rotation. It has hosted 13 Open championships since 1894, when it became the first club outside Scotland to host the championship. Author Ian Fleming used the Royal St. George's course under the name "Royal St. Marks" in his 1959 novel Goldfinger.
  • Scientific Articles Collected by Ian Fleming - Indiana University | The Lilly Library.
  • Shaken, not stirred.
  • Shaken, not stirred - catchphrase of Ian Fleming's fictional British Secret Service agent James Bond, and his preference for how he wished his martini prepared. The phrase first appears in the novel Diamonds Are Forever (1956), though Bond does not actually say the line until Dr. No (1958) but says it "shaken and not stirred" instead of "shaken, not stirred." It was first uttered by the James Bond character played by Sean Connery in Goldfinger in 1964.
  • THE BOND EXPERIENCE - "Living like Bond. One moment at a time."
  • The Book Collector - founded in 1952 by Ian Fleming. Published quarterly. Online resource: a place where librarians, book collectors and booksellers meet. "The only journal in the world that deals with book collecting, but it is much more than that – a bridge that joins together collectors, librarians and booksellers, and all who are interested in books, to have, to read, to enjoy in any way."
  • The cultural elements of James Bond films - Socio-cultural competence.
  • The Ian Fleming Foundation - "We have procured thirty-three vehicles that have been used in the making of the James Bond films."
  • The Ian Fleming map of Britain - The Telegaph.
  • The James Bond Archives - by Paul Duncan, Taschen.
  • The James Bond Car Collection - was a fortnightly (later monthly) release of James Bond model cars displayed in detailed scenes from the James Bond movies. From Bond's first car, the Sunbeam Alpine, to his newest, the Aston Martin DBS V12. The most legendary and some not so legendary cars from more than 50 years of Bond movies are featured. Each magazine issue came with a 1:43 scale model car from an EON James Bond movie, diecast in metal, with some models including gadgets and character figurines displayed on a moulded base. Back issues available.
  • The James Bond Dossier - "News and views of the world of 007."
  • The James Bond International Fan Club
  • The Mob Museum - Las Vegas, NV. Dedicated to featuring the artifacts, stories, and history of organized crime in the United States. E.g. the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre Wall are a Tommy gun (which can be touched, held and even “pretend” shot), an electric chair, as well as the barber chair Albert Anastasia was murdered in.
  • THE NEW ZARITSKY ARCHIVE - "Explore the prop, wardrobe and collecting world of James Bond through the eyes of a collector..."
  • The Suits of James Bond - comprehensive information resource.
  • THEME PARTY PEOPLE - "Live the Movies!"
  • This Tesla Model S Easter Egg Lets You Be James Bond - TechCrunch.
  • TOM FORD - James Bond’s tailor for the 23rd Bond film.
  • Shirley Bassey - Goldfinger (Live at Royal Albert Hall).
  • Top 10 James Bond Theme Songs
  • Turnbull & Asser, 71-72 Jermyn St, London SW1Y 6PF, England, U.K.
  • TURNBULL & ASSER - established 1885. 71 & 72 Jermyn Street, London. Bespoke shirtmaker. Over 1,000 different shirt fabrics alone are available to customers who wish to express their individuality through the clothes they wear. Ian Fleming's & James Bond's shirtmaker.
  • Universal Exports - "The Home of James Bond, 007."
  • Vesper Martini.
  • Vesper Martini Recipe - according to Casino Royale, Chapter 7: "Three measures of Gordon's, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake a very well until it's ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon-peel. (If you can get a vodka made with grain instead of potatoes, you will find it still better.)"
  • White's, 37 St James's Street, London SW1A 1JG, U.K.
  • WHITE'S - founded in 1693. 37 St. James's Street. Gentlemen's club. It is the oldest and most exclusive gentleman's club in London. It gained a reputation in the 18th century for both its exclusivity and the often raffish behaviour of its members. Notable current members include author Ian Fleming, Charles, Prince of Wales, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Conrad Black and Tom Stacey. Note that next door to the White's club is the Beretta Gallery, as in the Beretta 418, the firearm carried by James Bond in the first several books.
  • Who Inspired James Bond? - Who Inspired.
  • You only live once: Memories of Ian Fleming by Ivar Bryce - Amazon.com.
    Book Fairs
  • Frankfurt Book Fair.
  • 2016 book fairs - International Publishers Association.
  • 2016 International Book Fair Calendar - "World Literary Review."
    • Beijing International Book Fair | BIBF - since 1986. The largest publishing industry event in the Asian Market.
    • Bologna Children's Book Fair | La fiera del libro per ragazzi - "The rights place for children's content." Since 1963, it is held yearly for four days in March or April in Bologna, Italy. It is the meeting place for all professionals involved with creating and publishing children's books, and is mainly used for the buying and selling of rights, both for translations and for derived products like movies or animated series.
    • Brooklyn Book Festival - since 2006. Annual book fair held in Brooklyn, New York. Unlike most book fairs, the Brooklyn Book Festival caters to the adult readership, although they also feature numerous activities and readings for children. The festival includes themed readings, panel discussions, vendors, and author signings.
    • FRANKFURT BOOK FAIR | FRANKFURTER BUCHMESSE - since 1949. World's largest trade fair for books, based on the number of publishing companies represented.
    • Hay Festival of Literature & Arts - since 1988. "Imagine the World." Annual literature festival held in Hay-on-Wye, Powys, Wales, U.K. for ten days from May to June. Described by Bill Clinton in 2001 as "The Woodstock of the mind".
    • HONG KONG BOOK FAIR - since 1990. "Reading The World - The More, The Merrier." Organised by the Hong Kong Trade Development Council, held annually (usually in the middle of July) at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre.
    • LEIPZIG BOOK FAIR - second largest book fair in Germany after the Frankfurt Book Fair. Held annually in March. ecame the largest book fair in Germany in 1632 when it topped the fair in Frankfurt am Main in the number of books presented. It remained on top until 1945 when Frankfurt surpassed it to regain the number one spot.
    • LONDON BOOK FAIR - since 1971. Large book-publishing trade fair held annually, usually in April.
    • Moscow International Book Fair | MIBF - since 1977. The largest and the most representative international book forum in Russia, the most significant annual event for the Russian book industry.
    • NY Art Book Fair - Printed Matter, Inc's annual event that occurs at MoMA PS1 in Long Island City, New York, usually near the end of the month of September.
    • Quebec International Book Fair | Salon international du livre de QuÉbec - The theme "Books without borders", a focus on both young people's literature and international literature. Several authors from around the world will be in attendance and different events will be organized in association with the show.
    • Tokyo International Book Fair | TIBF - since 1993. "On Wednesday, July 2, 2014, "Her Imperial Highness Princess Mako of Japan, as Honorary President, attended the opening of the 21st Tokyo International Book Fair held at the Tokyo Big Sight Convention Center. About 1,530 publishing and related companies from 25 countries around the world gathered at the event in the capital’s Ariake district to make sales pitches and market their books."
    • turin international book fair | Salone Internazionale del Libro di Torino - since 1988. Italy's biggest bookshop. One of the largest book fairs in the world. Held annually in mid-May.
    Book Review Magazines
  • The Times Literary Supplement.
  • Book review magazines - Wikipedia.
  • Literary magazine - Wikipedia.
  • Story - (1931-1967 / 1989-1999). Showcasing short stories by new authors.
  • The Best Literary Magazines & Journals - AbeBooks.com.
  • Top 50 Literary Magazines - Every Writer's Resource.
    • Asymptote - "Exciting new international journal dedicated to literary translation and bringing together in one place the best in contemporary writing."
    • Athenaeum - literary magazine published in London, England from 1828 to 1921. It had a reputation for publishing the best writers of the age.
    • Blast - (1914-1915). Was the short-lived literary magazine of the Vorticist movement in Britain.
    • Broom - "An International Magazine of the Arts." Was a little magazine founded by Harold Loeb and Alfred Kreymborg and published from November 1921 to January 1924. Initially, the magazine was printed in Europe, first in Rome and then in Berlin, with the intention of bringing new, avant-garde art back to the U.S.
    • Cahiers d'art - since 1926. French artistic & literary journal. The journal has been noted for the quality of its articles and illustrations which promoted Modern Art in France for over thirty years. Cahiers d'Art carries no advertising and is published on an irregular schedule.
    • Claremont Review of Books - since 2000. Quarterly review of politics and statesmanship published by the Claremont Institute. Many consider it a conservative intellectual answer to the liberal New York Review of Books.
    • Cornhill Magazine - (1860–1975) was a Victorian magazine and literary journal.
    • Der Querschnitt - (The Cross Section) was an art magazine published by the German art dealer Alfred Flechtheim between 1921 and 1936. The magazine was based in Berlin. The magazine 'represented the politically detached aspirations of the aesthetically attuned of the Western world. Lightheartedly snobistish, the magazine;s inclusions of works by anyone who was anybody in the Weimar period and its unorthodox graphic and literary style qualifies it as an avant-garde publication.'
    • Die literarische Welt - since 1925. "Unabhängiges Organ für das deutsche Schrifttum."
    • Encounter - was a literary magazine, founded in 1953 by poet Stephen Spender and journalist Irving Kristol. The magazine ceased publication in 1991. Published in the United Kingdom, it was a largely Anglo-American intellectual and cultural journal, originally associated with the anti-Stalinist left. The magazine received covert funding from the Central Intelligence Agency, after the CIA and MI6 discussed the founding of an "Anglo-American left-of-centre publication" intended to counter the idea of cold war neutralism.
    • Europe - "Revue litteraire mensuelle." French literary magazine founded in 1923.
    • Everybody's Magazine - was an American magazine published from 1899 to 1929. Initially, the magazine published a combination of non-fiction articles and new fiction stories.
    • Evergreen Review - U.S.-based literary magazine founded by Barney Rosset, publisher of Grove Press. It existed in print from 1957 through 1973, and was re-launched online in 1998.
    • FLAVORWIRE - "Cultural News and Critique." Network of culturally connected people, covering events, art, books, music, and pop culture the world over. Highbrow, lowbrow, and everything in between: if it's compelling, we're sharing it.
    • Fraser's Magazine - was a general and literary journal published in London from 1830 to 1882, which initially took a strong Tory line in politics.
    • Gil Blas - (1879-1938). Was a Parisian literary periodical.
    • Harper's Magazine - since 1850. Monthly magazine of literature, politics, culture, finance, & the arts.
    • Horizon - "A Review of Literature and Art." Was an influential literary magazine published in London, UK, between 1940 and 1949. It was edited by Cyril Connolly, who made it into a platform for a wide range of distinguished and emerging writers.
    • Kirkus Reviews - since 1933. American book review magazine.
    • L'Esprit nouveau - (1920-1925). Revue consacrée à l'esthétisme contemporain dans toutes ses manifestations architecture, peinture, littérature, fondée par Le Corbusier et Amédée Ozenfant en 1920.
    • La Revue Blanche - was a French art and literary magazine run between 1889 and 1903. Some of the greatest writers and artists of the time were its collaborators.
    • Library Journal - since 1876. Trade publication for librarians.
    • LITERARY WEEKLY - "World Literary Review."
    • London Review of Books - since 1979. British journal of literary and intellectual essays. Published semi-monthly (24 times a year), it has the largest circulation of any literary magazine in Europe and is considered the leading journal edited by a woman in the Western world.
    • Longform.org - since 2010. Recommends new and classic non-fiction from around the web. Articles can be read on a browser or saved to read later with Readability, Instapaper, Pocket or Kindle.
    • Macmillan's Magazine - monthly British magazine from 1859 to 1907. The magazine was a literary periodical that published fiction and non-fiction works from primarily British authors.
    • North American Review - (1815-1940, 1964-). "At The North Amewrican Review, We Work To Make Literature And Art Matter." The first literary magazine in the United States.
    • Nouvelle Revue FranÇaise - (NRF, or The New French Review in English) is a literary magazine based in France. The magazine was founded in 1909 by a group of intellectuals including André Gide, Jacques Copeau, and Jean Schlumberger. In 1911, Gaston Gallimard became editor of the revue, which led to the founding of the publishing house, Éditions Gallimard. During World War I its publication stopped. The magazine was relaunched in 1919. Established writers such as Paul Bourget and Anatole France contributed to the magazine from its early days. The magazine's influence grew until, during the interwar period, it became the leading literary journal, occupying a unique role in French culture. The first published works by André Malraux and Jean-Paul Sartre were in the pages of the Revue.
    • Partisan Review - (1934-2003). Was a small circulation quarterly "little magazine" dealing with literature, politics, and cultural commentary published in New York City.
    • Poetry - published in Chicago since 1912, is one of the leading monthly poetry journals in the English-speaking world.
    • PUBLISHERS WEEKLY | PW - since 1872. American weekly trade news magazine targeted at publishers, librarians, booksellers and literary agents. Published continuously since 1872, it has carried the tagline, "The International News Magazine of Book Publishing and Bookselling". With 51 issues a year, the emphasis today is on book reviews.
    • Quarterly Review - was a literary and political periodical founded in March 1809 by the well known London publishing house John Murray. It ceased publication in 1967.
    • Revue de Paris - (1829-1970). French literary magazine.
    • Scribner's Magazine - was an American periodical published by the publishing house of Charles Scribner's Sons from January 1887 to May 1939.
    • Shenandoah - since 1950. Major literary magazine published by Washington and Lee University.
    • STRAND MAGAZINE - the magazine for mystery & short story lovers.
    • The American Mercury - American magazine published from 1924 to 1981. It was founded as the brainchild of H. L. Mencken and drama critic George Jean Nathan. The magazine featured writing by some of the most important writers in the United States through the 1920s and 1930s. After a change in ownership in the 1940s, the magazine attracted conservative writers.
    • The Anglo-Saxon Review - quarterly miscellany edited by Lady Randolph Churchill, and published in London by John Lane. It was short lived, running from June 1899 to September 1901.
    • THE ATLANTIC - founded (as The Atlantic Monthly) in 1857 in Boston, Massachusetts, now based in Washington, D.C. It was created as a literary and cultural commentary magazine, growing to achieve a national reputation as a high-quality review with a moderate worldview. As the former name suggests, it was a monthly magazine for 144 years until 2001, when it published eleven issues; it published ten issues yearly from 2003 on, dropped "Monthly" from the cover starting with the January/February 2004 issue, and officially changed the name in 2007. The Atlantic features articles in the fields of the arts, the economy, foreign affairs, political science, and technology.
    • The Book Collector - founded in 1952 by Ian Fleming. Published quarterly. Online resource: a place where librarians, book collectors and booksellers meet. "The only journal in the world that deals with book collecting, but it is much more than that – a bridge that joins together collectors, librarians and booksellers, and all who are interested in books, to have, to read, to enjoy in any way."
    • The Bookman (London) - was a monthly magazine published in London from 1891 until 1934 by Hodder & Stoughton. It was a catalogue of the current publications that also contained reviews, advertising and illustrations.
    • The Bookman (New York) - (1895-1933). Was a literary journal. Its first editor was Harry Thurston Peck, who worked on its staff from 1895 to 1906. With the journal's first issue in February 1895, Peck created America's first bestseller list. The lists in The Bookman ran from 1895 until 1918, and is the only comprehensive source of annual bestsellers in the United States from 1895-1912, when Publishers Weekly began publishing their own lists.
    • THE BOOKSELLER - since 1858. British magazine reporting news on the publishing industry.
    • The Calendar of Modern Letters - (1925-1927). Was a short-lived British literary review journal.
    • The Criterion - was a British literary magazine published from October 1922 to January 1939. It was created by the poet, dramatist, and literary critic T. S. Eliot who served as its editor for its entire run.
    • The Dial - (1840-1929). Was an American magazine published intermittently from 1840 to 1929. In its first form, from 1840 to 1844, it served as the chief publication of the Transcendentalists. In the 1880s it was revived as a political magazine. From 1920 to 1929 it was an influential outlet for modernist literature in English.
    • The Double Dealer - (1921-1926). Was a short-lived but influential New-Orleans-based literary journal of the 1920s.
    • The Egoist - was a London literary magazine published from 1914 to 1919, during which time it published important early modernist poetry and fiction. In its manifesto, it claimed to "recognise no taboos," and published a number of controversial works, such as parts of Ulysses. Today, it is considered "England's most important Modernist periodical."
    • The English Review - was a literary magazine published in London from 1908 to 1937. At its peak, the journal published some of the leading writers of its day.
    • The Harvard Monthly - was a literary magazine of Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, beginning October 1885 until suspending publication following the Spring 1917 issue.
    • THE LITERARY REVIEW | TLR - since 1979. "An International Journal of Contemporary Writing." Its many special issues have introduced new fiction, poetry, and essays from many nations, regions, or languages to English readers.
    • The Little Review - American literary magazine founded by Margaret Anderson, published literary and art work from 1914 to May 1929. With the help of Jane Heap and Ezra Pound, Anderson created a magazine that featured a wide variety of transatlantic modernists and cultivated many early examples of experimental writing and art.
    • The New Age - was a British literary magazine, noted for its wide influence under the editorship of A. R. Orage from 1907 to 1922.
    • The New English Weekly - (1932-1942). Was a leading review of "Public Affairs, Literature and the Arts."
    • The New Freewoman - (1913). Was a monthly London literary magazine.
    • THE NEW YORK REVIEW OF BOOKS - since 1963. Fortnightly magazine with articles on literature, culture and current affairs.
    • THE NEW YORK TIMES BEST SELLERS LIST
    • The New York Times Book Review - since 1896. Weekly paper-magazine supplement to The New York Times in which current non-fiction and fiction books are reviewed. It is one of the most influential and widely read book review publications in the industry.
    • THE NEW YORK TIMES: BOOKS
    • The Paris Review - quarterly literary magazine established in Paris in 1953 by Harold L. Humes, Peter Matthiessen, and George Plimpton. In its first five years, The Paris Review published works by Jack Kerouac, Philip Larkin, V. S. Naipaul, Philip Roth, Terry Southern, Adrienne Rich, Italo Calvino, Samuel Beckett, Nadine Gordimer, Jean Genet and Robert Bly. The headquarters moved from Paris to New York City in 1973.
    • THE RUMPUS - since 1992. Visually resembling the New York Post, Rumpus is a controversial, humorous publication with content ranging from Yale campus gossip to investigative reporting.
    • The Saturday Evening Post - since 1821. Bimonthly American magazine. From the 1920s to the 1960s, it was one of the most widely circulated and influential magazines for the American middle class, with fiction, non-fiction, cartoons and features that reached millions of homes every week.
    • The Smart Set - (1900-1930). Literary magazine founded in America in March 1900 by Colonel William d'Alton Mann. During its heyday under the editorship of H.L. Mencken and George Jean Nathan, The Smart Set offered many up-and-coming authors their start and gave them access to a relatively large audience.
    • The Strand Magazine - (1891-1950). Was a monthly magazine founded by George Newnes, composed of short fiction and general interest articles.
    • THE TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT | TLS - since 1902. "The leading international forum for literary culture." The TLS first appeared in 1902 as a supplement to The Times, but became a separate publication in 1914. Many distinguished writers have been contributors, including T. S. Eliot, Henry James, and Virginia Woolf, but reviews were normally anonymous until 1974. From 1974, signed reviews were gradually introduced during the editorship of John Gross.
    • The Transatlantic Review - was an influential monthly literary magazine edited by Ford Madox Ford in 1924. The magazine was based in Paris but was published in London by Gerald Duckworth and Company. Although it published only 12 issues—one in each month in 1924—the magazine had an influential impact on early 20th-century English literature by publishing works such as an early extract from James Joyce's Finnegans Wake.
    • Time & Tide - (1920-1986). British weekly political and literary review magazine founded by Margaret, Lady Rhondda.
    • Transatlantic Review - (1959-1977). Was a literary journal founded and edited by Joseph F. McCrindle in 1959, and published at first in Rome, then London and New York. McCrindle revived the title of the original Paris Transatlantic Review founded by Ford Madox Ford in 1924.
    • Transition - (1927-1938). Was an experimental literary journal that featured surrealist, expressionist, and Dada art and artists.
    • Yale Literary Magazine - founded in 1836. The oldest literary magazine in the United States and publishes poetry and fiction by Yale undergraduates twice per academic year.
    Booksellers (Online)
  • AbeBooks - since 1996. "Passion for books." AbeBooks is an online marketplace for books. Millions of brand new books, used books, rare books, and out-of-print books are offered for sale through the AbeBooks websites from thousands of booksellers around the world. Readers can find bestsellers, collectors can find rare books, students can find new and used textbooks, and treasure hunters can find long-lost books.
  • Alibris - since 1997. "Find Your Next Favorite Book." Online store that sells new books, used books, out-of-print books, rare books, and other media through an online network of independent booksellers.
  • AMAZON.COM - as of February 22, 2016: 57,590,067 books.
  • ANTIQUARIAN BOOKSELLERS' ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA | ABAA - "Antiquarian and Rare Books."
  • BARNES & NOBLE - Internet's largest bookstore: "We stock over 1 million titles for immediate delivery - that's more titles than any other online bookseller."
  • BOOKFINDER.COM - search for new & used books, textbooks, out-of-print and rare books.
  • BOOKMAN - used, unique and out of print books.
  • BOOKMOOCH.COM - "Give books away. Get books you want." Exchange books and trade them, like a book swap or book barter.
  • BOOKS-A-MILLION ONLINE BOOKSTORE - buy discount books, music, movies, magazines.
  • COMIC CONNECT - the online marketplace for comic buyers & sellers.
  • DE GRUYTER - since 1749. For more than two-hundred and sixty years the name De Gruyter has been synonymous with high-quality, landmark publications in the humanities and natural sciences.
  • FOYLES - fiction, medical, textbooks and more at our London store and online.
  • HARVARD BOOK STORE - since 1932.
  • HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS - since 1913.
  • Independent Online Booksellers Association | IOBA - "Find books on IOBA."
  • International League of Antiquarian Booksellers | ILAB Rare Booksellers - since 1947. "The World's Best Books, the World's Best Booksellers." ILAB represents 1,850 of the World’s best booksellers dealing in fine, rare, old and collectable books in all fields. Search for them and their books.
  • OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS - founded in 1586. The largest university press in the world.
  • PENGUIN BOOKS - UK book shop and online bookstore.
  • Powell's Books - since 1971. "Used, New, and Out of Print Books. We Buy and Sell." Claims to be the largest independent new and used bookstore in the world.
  • PROMETHEUS BOOKS - a leader in publishing books for the educational, scientific, professional, library, popular, and consumer markets since 1969.
  • RANDOM HOUSE - bringing you the best in fiction, nonfiction, and children's books.
  • Read by Famous - "From Their Hands To Yours." We sell books that were owned and read by people who have achieved high levels of recognition in their particular fields. Not copies of titles they have read, but the actual books that these people owned and read.
  • SIMON & SCHUSTER - new book releases, bestsellers, author info & more.
  • TASCHEN BOOKS - publisher of books on art, architecture, design and photography.
  • TENEUES PUBLISHING GROUP - leading book publishers in the areas of illustrated books on photography, design, lifestyle, travel, collector's editions, luxury photography books and pictorial calendars.
  • The Book Depository - since 2004. "Millions of books with free delivery worldwide." UK-based online book seller with a large catalogue offered with free shipping to over 160 countries.
  • W.H. SMITH - "1,000's of books to suit all tastes." Books, audio books, bestselling hardbacks & much more.
    Bookshops & Bookstores
  • Karl Lagerfeld posing in his Parisian bookstore: 7L, 7 Rue de Lille, 75007 Paris, France.
  • 7L BOOKSHOP - 7, rue de Lille, 75007 Paris, France. Created by Karl Lagerfeld in December 1999. Specialized in art and photography, fashion, design and interior architecture and architecture.
  • Adrian Harrington, 64a Kensington Church Street, Kensington, London, England, U.K.
  • ADRIAN HARRINGTON - since 1971. Rare books; rare first editions; leather bound sets and general antiquarian. "We specialise in all aspects of the literary James Bond, including Ian Fleming and the official 'continuation' authors in hardback and softcover, their periodical and magazine appearances, proof copies, letters, documents, artwork and other signed material." 64a Kensington Church Street, Kensington, London, England, U.K.
  • Another Country, Riemannstraße 7, Kreuzberg, 10961 Berlin, Germany.
  • Another Country - Kreuzberg, Berlin, Germany. Another Country is an English Language second hand bookshop which is mostly used as a library. They have about 20.000 books that you can buy or borrow. You simply pay the price of a book, which you get back, minus a 1.5 Euro charge, should you choose to return it. Another Country is also a club which hosts readings, cultural events, social evening, film nights and many other things. Gridskipper said: "In no particular order, Another Country is a secondhand bookshop, library, and subculture -- blogosphere and subculture events included. Alan Raphaeline, a marvelously outré Briton, is the gunslinger behind this highly-spirited and diversified place. The best way to experience Another Country is simply to arrive and allow its orb to swallow you whole. A word of advice: Leave your ego and Harry Potter inquiries at the door."
  • ASPREY - "The Asprey Fine and Rare Book Department offers an eclectic range of first and limited editions dating from the 17th century to the present day." 167 New Bond Street, London, England, U.K.
  • Atlantis Books, Main Marble Road, T.K. 84702 Oía, Kikladhes, Greece.
  • Atlantis Books - Oía, Santorini, Greece. Atlantis Books is an independent bookshop on the island of Santorini, Greece, founded in 2004 by a group of friends from Cyprus, England, and the United States. We have fiction and non-fiction in Greek, English, Spanish, Italian, German, French, and two shelves of Dutch. Throughout the year we host literary festivals, film screenings, book readings, and good old fashioned dance parties.
  • Barnes&Noble, 555 Fifth Avenue, New York City, NY 10017, U.S.A.
  • BARNES&NOBLE - 555 Fifth Avenue, New York City, NY 10017, U.S.A. A Fortune 500 company, is the world’s largest bookseller and the nation’s highest rated bookselling brand.
  • Bart's Books, 302 W Matilija St, Ojai, CA 93023, U.S.A.
  • Bart's Books - Ojai, California, U.S.A. "The World's Greatest Outdoor Bookstore." Bookstore founded by Richard Bartinsdale in 1964. It is a (mostly) outdoors bookstore, and some books are available for sale at all hours. Shelves of books face the street, and patrons are asked to drop coins into the door's coinbox to pay for any books they take whenever the store is closed.
  • Barter Books, Alnwick Station, Wagon Way Rd, Alnwick NE66 2NP, England, U.K.
  • Barter Books - Alnwick, England, U.K. Second-hand bookshop located in the historic English market town of Alnwick, Northumberland owned and run by Stuart and Mary Manley. It has over 200,000 visitors a year, 40% of whom are from outside the area, and is one of the largest second-hand bookstores in Europe. It is considered a local tourist attraction and has been described as "the British Library of second-hand bookshops."
  • The Norrington Room of Blackwell's Bookshop, 48-51 Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3BQ, England, U.K.
  • Blackwell's Bookshop - flagship branch: 48-51 Broad Street, Oxford, England, U.K. Backwell's is an institution in Oxford. Founded by Benjamin Henry Blackwell, the son of the first city librarian, in 1879. The shop was initially only twelve feet square, but quickly grew to include space upstairs, in the cellar, and neighbouring shops. It is now Oxford's most famous and leading bookshop, with other specialist branches elsewhere in Broad Street and Oxford. It has the largest single room devoted to book sales in all of Europe (the 10,000 sq. ft. Norrington Room).
  • The Bookàbar Bookshop, via Milano 15/17, 00184 Roma, Italy.
  • BookÀbar - Rome, Italy. In cool, gleaming white rooms designed by Firouz Galdo, Arion Esposizioni – the bookshop attached to Palazzo delle Esposizioni – is just made for browsing. There are books on art, architecture and photography, DVDs, CDs, vinyl, children’s books and gifts for the design-lover in your life.
  • Cafebrería el Péndulo, Alejandro Dumas 81, Polanco, Miguel Hidalgo, 11560 Ciudad de México, Distrito Federal, Mexico.
  • CafebrerÍa El PÉndulo - Mexico City, Mexico. Not only the bookstore in your urban city which can be three-in-one, this bookstore can too, because other than as a bookstore, Cafebrería el Péndulo also providing Bar And Café. The visitors can read books, eat food, also can enjoy the clean air produced by various types of plants decorated in the bookstore.
  • Cathach Books, 10 Duke St, Dublin 2, Ireland.
  • CATHACH BOOKS - Dublin, Ireland. Since 1969 Dublin's leading antiquarian bookshop, located on Duke Street in Dublin's city centre. Our particular specialty is in 20th century Irish literature. We have an unrivalled selection of rare Editions by James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, W.B. Yeats, Samuel Beckett, Seamus Heaney, Brendan Behan, Flann O'Brien and many others. We also stock a wide variety of books on Irish history and topography from the 17th Century to the recent past.
  • City Lights Bookstore, 261 Columbus Ave, San Francisco, CA 94133, U.S.A.
  • City Lights Bookstore - San Francisco, CA, U.S.A. Founded in 1953 by poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti and Peter D. Martin (who left two years later). Specializes in world literature, the arts, and progressive politics. In 2001, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors made City Lights an official historic landmark - the first time this had been granted to a business, rather than a building - citing the organization for "playing a seminal role in the literary and cultural development of San Francisco and the nation." It recognized the bookstore as "a landmark that attracts thousands of book lovers from all over the world because of its strong ambiance of alternative culture and arts".
  • Cook & Book, Place du Temps Libre 1, 1200 Woluwe-Saint-Lambert, Belgium.
  • Cook & Book - Brussels, Belgium. There is a whole separate English section (decorated as an oldschool British library/gentlemen's club) as well, which is almost a must for most bookstores in a city like Brussels. The interior design of the bookstore deserves a special mention as it is nothing short of unique. The interior architects had a huge space to work with and they created nine autonomous spaces, each with its own character and atmosphere. There's even a terrace where you can read or eat or both, as well as a small playground for the children.
  • Corso Como Bookshop, Corso Como 10, 20154 Milano, Italy.
  • Corso Como Bookshop - Milan, Italy. Extensive selection of publication on art, architecture,. design, graphics and fashion,. with a strong emphasis on photography. Shopping and dining complex in Milan, Italy. It combines outlets that show and sell works of art, fashion, music, design, cuisine and culture. It was founded in 1990 in Milan, Italy, by gallerist and publisher Carla Sozzani.
  • Daikanyama T-Site, 17 Sarugakucho, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
  • Daikanyama T-Site - Tokyo, Japan. In a perfect world, all bookshops would be like this. Tokyo's Klein Dytham Architecture won an award at the World Architecture Festival for their work on Daikanyama T-Site, which is spread across three interlinked buildings adorned with lattices of interlocking Ts. That 'T' stands for rental chain Tsutaya, whose seemingly bottomless pockets helped fund the kind of book emporium that most capital cities can only dream of. It's easy to lose hours thumbing through the selections here, which include a good range of English-language titles, art books, antique tomes and magazine back issues. (TimeOut Tokyo).
  • Daunt Books, 83 Marylebone High Street, London W1U 4QW, England, U.K.
  • Daunt Books - London, England, U.K. "Daunt Books is an original Edwardian bookshop with long oak galleries and graceful skylights situated in Marylebone High Street, London. We also have shops in Chelsea, Holland Park, Cheapside, Hampstead and Belsize Park."
  • DUSSMANN DAS KULTUR KAUFHAUS - Berlin, Germany.
  • El Ateneo, Av Callao, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
  • El Ateneo - Buenos Aires, Argentina. Situated at 1860 Santa Fe Avenue in Barrio Norte, the building was designed as a theatre called Teatro Gran Splendid in May 1919. The ornate former theatre was leased by Grupo Ilhsa in February 2000. Ilhsa, through Tematika, owns El Ateneo and Yenny booksellers (totaling over 40 stores), as well as the El Ateneo publishing house. The building was subsequently renovated and converted into a book and music shop. The building still retains the feeling of the grand theatre it once was. The Guardian, a prominent British periodical, named El Ateneo second in its 2008 list of the World's Ten Best Bookshops. Over a million people walk through its doors annually.
  • Foyles, 107 Charing Cross Road, London WC2H 0DT, England, U.K.
  • FOYLES - London, England, U.K. Once listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the world's largest bookshop in terms of shelf area (30 miles/50 kilometres) and number of titles on display. In the past, it was famed for its anachronistic, eccentric and sometimes infuriating business practices; so much so that it was a tourist attraction. It has since modernised, opened new branches and established an on-line store.
  • HATCHARDS BOOKSHOP - booksellers since 1797. London, England, U.K.
  • Heywood Hill London Bookstore Behind Some of the Very Best Libraries - curates impressive collections for discerning customers in 60 different countries — and specializes in the obscure.
  • Livraria Lello & Irmão, Rua das Carmelitas 144, 4050-161 Porto, Portugal.
  • Lello Bookstore - Porto, Portugal. Since 1881. One of the oldest bookstores in Portugal. In 2011, the travel publishing company Lonely Planet classified Livraria Lello as the third best bookstore in the world.
  • Ler Devagar, Rua Rodrigues Faria, No. 103, Edificio G, Space 0.3, Alcantara, 1300-501 Lisbon, Portugal.
  • Ler Devagar - Lisbon, Portugal. Ler Devagar (literally, "read slowly" in Portuguese) is a bookstore and more. First, it is located in the LX Factory, a building built in 1864 to manufacture thread and fabric. The machinery has been moved out, and the large open factory spaces have become a mecca for the Lisbon creative sector. Advertising agencies, designer workshops and art galleries now fill the space. It is the ideal location for a bookstore hoping to expand the minds of its customers. Ler Devagar stocks a large selection of books across two floors of space. Arts and culture are heavily represented here, as are books in many foreign languages. An art gallery is upstairs. There is also space for book readings and lectures. Cozy up to your new book with a cup of tea from the industrial bar.
  • Librairie la Hune - 16-18, rue de l'Abbaye 75006 Paris, France.
  • Livraria da Vila, Rua Fradique Coutinho, 915 - Vl Madalena, São Paulo, 05416-011, Brazil.
  • LIVRARIA DA VILA - São Paulo, Brazil. A real paradise for book lovers! Every corner of this fantastic bookstore invites shoppers to spend time reading and exploring.
  • LONDON REVIEW BOOKSHOP - London, England, U.K.
  • MÁL & MENNING - Reykjavik, Iceland.
  • Ofr. - 20, rue Dupetit-Thouars, 75003 Paris, France.
  • Plural Bookshop, Páričkova 18, 821 08 Bratislava, Slovakia.
  • Plural Bookshop - Bratislava, Slovakia. The stairs function as reading and display area. Wall-to-wall bookshelves and simple, clean design.
  • Selexyz Dominicanen Bookstore, Dominicanenkerkstraat 1, NL-6211 CZ Maastricht, The Netherlands.
  • Selexyz Dominicanen Bookstore - Maastricht, The Netherlands. Holland's Most Sacred Bookstore: occupying a 13th-century Dominican church, Selexyz Dominicanen consists of a steel bookstack rising towards the heavens. Cunningly, this both leaves the nave’s grandeur intact and creates 1,200 sq metres of selling space – despite the 750-sq-metre floor area. Staircases and a lift lead to the top of the three-storey stack, where you can eyeball 14th-century ceiling paintings. The altar has been superseded by a café, with a halo of lights hanging above a cruciform table. It’s an award-winning architectural triumph and a peaceful haven for page thumbing.
  • Shakespeare & Company Bookshop, 37 Rue de la Bûcherie, 75005 Paris, France.
  • SHAKESPEARE & COMPANY - 37, rue de la Bûcherie, 75005 Paris, France. Opened in 1951 and serves both as a regular bookstore and as a reading library, specializing in English-language literature.
  • SLIGHTLY FOXED - London, England, U.K. "A World of Reading."
  • STRAND BOOKSTORE - New York City, NY, U.S.A.
  • Taschen, 2 Rue de Buci, 75006 Paris, France.
  • Taschen - 2, rue de Buci, 75006 Paris, France. This bookshop is a real treasure trove, founded by Philippe Starck, where the exclusive selection of books on painting, cinema, photography and eroticism attracts lovers of rare objects. From “Icons” collections at 6.99 euros to “Collectors” editions of numbered books, sometimes signed by their authors at 10,000 euros, Taschen only offers exclusive items, thus pleasing collectors as well as the curious. An unmissable place to be in style.
  • The American Book Center, Spui 12, 1012 XA Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • The American Book Center - Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The American Book Center, or simply the ABC, is actually much more than a bookstore and it plays an important role in the promotion of English literature and language in the multicultural city of Amsterdam. This bookstore has a long tradition in Amsterdam, and in 2006 it has moved to a new location - a three hundred year old building in the center of the city. The ABC's three floors are ready to satisfy the needs of even the more exigent readers. Actually, the ABC is often stated as the biggest American bookstore in continental Europe.
  • The Bookworm, Building 4, Nan Sanlitun Road, Chao Yang District, Beijing, China.
  • The Bookworm - Beijing, China. A bookshop, library, bar, restaurant and events space, now with four locations in three cities – Beijing, Suzhou and Chengdu. "It’s easy to see why The Bookworm is such a hit among Beijingers; where else can you while away the hours savouring fabulous fare, browsing thousands of books, sipping good espresso, being regaled by eminent authors, catching up with friends over your favourite tipple, or simply just checking your emails? The spacious, interconnecting rooms with floor-to-ceiling books on every wall are light and airy in summer, yet cosy and snug in winter. And the roof terrace is perfect for yard-arm cocktails."
  • The Last Bookstore, 453 South Spring St, Los Angeles, CA 90013, U.S.A.
  • The Last Bookstore - Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A. The Last Bookstore occupies a space that used to be the main floor of Crocker National Bank -- a major financial institution when Spring Street flourished as the "Wall Street of the west" in the 1920s. Upon entering, the ceiling towers above and grand marble columns transport you back to a time when Los Angeles' wealthiest men and women entrusted their millions inside these walls. On the ground floor, bestsellers and beautiful coffee table books mingle with a record section and a coffee bar. There's also a raised stage where events like readings and book signings take place. (The Huffington Post).
  • The Mysterious Bookshop, 58 Warren St, New York City, NY 10007-1099, U.S.A.
  • THE MYSTERIOUS BOOKSHOP - New York City, NY, U.S.A. "The World's Finest Mystery Specialty Store. Offering the best in Mystery, Crime, Suspense, Espionage & Detective Fiction."
  • W.H. SMITH - over 550 High Street stores and 440 Travel outlets at airports, train stations, hospitals and motorway service areas.
  • World's Biggest Bookstore, 20 Edward St, Toronto, ON M5G 1C9, Canada.
  • World's Biggest Bookstore - Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Owned by Indigo Books and Music. The three storey store covered 64,000 square feet and is noted for its bright lights and over 20 kilometres of bookshelves. At the time of its opening in 1980, in a converted bowling alley, it was unchallenged in its claim as the biggest bookstore in the world. Although it retains the name today, the Guinness Book of World Records lists a Barnes and Noble outlet in New York City as the world's largest bookstore based on floor space, although Powell's Books of Portland, USA is usually considered the largest based on shelf-space. Nevertheless, World's Biggest Bookstore still claims the title on the basis that it depends on how "biggest" is defined: while Barnes and Noble has more floor space, World's Biggest Bookstore carries more titles.
    E-Books
  • E-book.
  • Adobe READER - "Free PDF viewer download."
  • Amazon Kindle Oasis review: the luxury e-reader really is something special - The Guardian.
  • COMPARISON OF E-BOOK FORMATS - Wikipedia.
  • E-BOOK - Wikipedia.
  • E-Book Sales Slip, and Print Is Far From Dead - The New York Times.
  • Electronic publishing - Wikipedia.
  • How to download e-books from your local library - CNET.
  • Internet Archive - founded in 1996. "Digital Library of Free Books, Movies, Music & Wayback Machine."
  • THE DIGITAL READER - "Read More, Carry Less." News, review, & opinion blog.
    • AMAZON.COM'S E-BOOK STORE - as of May 10, 2014: 2,644,690 titles Kindle Edition.
    • BARNES & NOBLE - over 1 million titles!
    • Belle Bridge Books - "Books for every reader's imagination."
    • BOOKS-A-MILLION - eBooks, bestsellers, hard-to-find books.
    • BOOKTRACK - "Soundtracks for Books." A new chapter in the evolution of storytelling, and an industry "first" in publishing, by creating synchronized soundtracks for e-books that dramatically boost the reader's imagination and engagement. Booktrack is already well on its way to creating a new genre of entertainment. Download Booktracks in the Apple App store for your iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch.
    • CLASSIC LITERATURE LIBRARY - free public domain ebooks and classic books.
    • DAILYLIT - "DailyLit lets you read literary classics and great new fiction in short installments that you can pick up and put down anytime. Once you’ve found a book, just select when you want your installments to arrive in your inbox."
    • DE GRUYTER - the De Gruyter e-dition makes over 60,000 high-quality titles available from De Gruyter’s more than 260-year publishing history.
    • Forgotten Books - "Read free books online at Forgotten Books." 484,473 free books. Largest online eBooks library.
    • FOYLES - range of more than 73,000 fiction and non-fiction eBooks
    • GOOGLE E-BOOK STORE - "Buy anywhere, read anywhere." More than 3 million Google eBooks.
    • Hachette
    • Harlequin - "Entertain, enrich, inspire."
    • HarperCollins
    • IBOOKS - for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad on the iTunes App Store.
    • INDIEBOUND BOOKSTORE - offers more than 4 million eBook titles.
    • Kensington - America's Independent Publisher."
    • KINDLE E-BOOK STORE - as of May 10, 2014: 2,644,690 titles.
    • Kindle Unlimited - "Enjoy unlimited access to over 600,000 titles and thousands of audiobooks on any device for just US$9.99 a month."
    • KOBO - "With Kobo, you can browse, search, buy and read your favorite eBooks on just about any device you choose - from select Smartphones, tablets, computers, eReaders and more."
    • Ludvig Holberg’s Writings - "Ludvig Holberg (1684–1754) is one of the main figures of the Scandinavian Enlightenment. His numerous and multifaceted writings occupy a central position in the literature of both Denmark and Norway. This is the first digital critical edition of Holberg’s collected writings. The texts are fully searchable and equipped with commentaries, introductions, critical apparatus, and facsimiles."
    • Macmillan
    • Metabook - "for iPad and iPhone." The new patent-pending digital publishing platform and reading experience for the 21st Century.
    • Open Library - "Open Library is yours to borrow, read & browse." The World's classic literature at your fingertips. Over 1,000,000 free ebook titles available.
    • Oyster - since 2012. "Oyster is simply the best way to read." Streaming service for digital ebooks, available for Android, iOS, Kindle Fire, and NOOK HD/HD+ devices. It is also available on any web browser on a desktop or laptop computer. Oyster holds over 1 million books in its library, and as of September 2015, the service is only available in the United States.
    • PENGUIN EBOOKS - "Whether you're looking for something new, want to catch up on the latest bestsellers or just fancy browsing, we have something here for everyone."
    • POTTERMORE - Harry Potter e-books.
    • POWELL'S BOOKS
    • PROJECT GUTENBERG - "Free ebooks." The first producer of free electronic books (eBooks). The place where you can download over 49,000 free ebooks to read on your PC, iPad, Kindle, Sony Reader, iPhone, Android or other portable device.
    • Random House
    • REFERENCE GLOBAL - Walter de Gruyter is among the first academic publishers in the world to provide electronic access to its journals, books, and databases on a single platform.
    • SIMON & SCHUSTER
    • SMASHWORDS - "Your ebook. Your way." "Smashwords is the world's largest distributor of indie ebooks. We make it fast, free and easy for any author or publisher, anywhere in the world, to publish and distribute ebooks to the major retailers."
    • THE DIGITAL DEAD SEA SCROLLS - in partnership with Google.
    • THE ONLINE BOOKS PROJECT - "Listing over 1 million free books on the Web."
    • W.H. SMITH - "Million of e-Books to suit all tastes."
    Libraries
  • Public library.
  • 25 Most Famous Libraries Of The World - LibraryScienceList.com.
  • 62 of the World's Most Beautiful Libraries - Mental Floss.
  • Explore 671,628 items digitized from The New York Public Library's collections - The New York Public Library.
  • Famous Libraries - Gentleman Scholar.
  • Famous Libraries & Reading Rooms - Pinterest.
  • Getty Search Gateway - allows users to search across several of the Getty repositories, including collections databases, library catalogs, collection inventories, and archival finding aids.
  • Heywood Hill London Bookstore Behind Some of the Very Best Libraries - curates impressive collections for discerning customers in 60 different countries — and specializes in the obscure.
  • Homes with magnificent libraries - Sotheby's.
  • LIBRARY - Wikipedia.
  • Libraries of the Rich and Famous - Book Riot.
  • LIBRARIES OF THE WORLD - and their catalogues.
  • Online Computer Library Center | OCLC - founded in 1967. "A nonprofit, membership, computer library service and research organization dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world’s information and reducing information costs."
  • Reinventing the Library - The New York Times.
  • The Biggest and the Most Famous Libraries in the World - Travelatus Guide.
  • The most beautiful libraries in America - in pictures - The Guardian.
  • The most spectacular libraries in the world - The Telegraph.
  • UNESCO LIBRARY
  • WORLDCAT - created in 1971. The largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world. A union catalog which itemizes the collections of 72,000 libraries in 170 countries and territories which participate in the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) global cooperative. It is built and maintained collectively by the participating libraries.
    • Bibliotheca Alexandrina.
    • Abbey library of Saint Gall - library collection is the oldest in Switzerland, and is one of earliest and most important monastic libraries in the world. It holds 2,100 manuscripts dating back to the 8th through the 15th centuries, 1,650 incunabula (printed before 1500), and old printed books. The library holds almost 160,000 volumes. The library books are available for public use, but the books printed before 1900 must be read in the Reading Room. The library hall, designed by the architect Peter Thumb in a Rococo style, is considered the most beautiful non-sacred room of this style in Switzerland and one of the most perfect library rooms around the world.
    • Bapst Art Library, Boston College, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3810, U.S.A.
    • Bapst Art Library - named for the first president of Boston College, served as the original Library from 1925 until the opening of the Thomas P. O'Neill Library in 1984. It now supports the increasingly interdisciplinary teaching and research needs in the areas of Art, Architecture, Museum Studies and Photography throughout the University and specifically for the Department of Fine Arts.
    • Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 121 Wall Street, New Haven, CT 06511, U.S.A.
    • Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library - a 1963 gift of the Beinecke family. It is one of the largest buildings in the world devoted entirely to rare books and manuscripts. The library has room in the central tower for 180,000 volumes and room for over 600,000 volumes in the underground book stacks. The library contains roughly 500,000 volumes and several million manuscripts.
    • Biblioteca Colombina, Institución Colombina, C/ Alemanes s/n, 41004 Sevilla, Spain.
    • Biblioteca Colombina - Sevilla, Spain. The library contains incunabula and rare works on the discovery of America. It contains manuscripts written by Christopher Columbus himself.
    • Bibliotheca Alexandrina.
    • BIBLIOTHECA ALEXANDRINA - both a commemoration of the Library of Alexandria that was lost in antiquity and an attempt to rekindle something of the brilliance that this earlier center of study and erudition represented.
    • The Radcliffe Camera housing the Radcliffe Science Library at the Bodleian Library viewed from the University Church.
    • BODLEIAN LIBRARY - main research library of the University of Oxford established in 1602 by Thomas Bodley with a colection of 2,000 books. Today, there are more than 9 million items on 176 kilometres of shelving. It is one of the oldest libraries in Europe, and in Britain is second in size only to the British Library.
    • British Library's reading room.
    • BRITISH LIBRARY - "Explore the world's knowledge. We hold 14 million books, 920,000 journal and newspaper titles, 58 million patents, 3 million sound recordings, and so much more." The world's largest library in terms of total number of items holding over 150 million items in all known languages and formats. While it holds more items in total, its book collection (14 million) is second only to the American Library of Congress.
    • CAMBRIDGE DIGITAL LIBRARY - "Cambridge University Library contains evidence of some of the greatest ideas and discoveries over two millennia. We want to make our collections accessible to anyone, anywhere in the world with an internet connection and a thirst for knowledge."
    • EUROPEANA - "Think Culture." Search through the cultural collections of Europe. It links you to over 20 million digital items (2012).
    • George Peabody Library, 17 E Mt Vernon Pl, Baltimore, MD 21202, U.S.A.
    • George Peabody Library - founded in 1852 through a large donation from investment banker George Peabody. Today, it houses over 300,000 volumes that are part of the Special Collections department. The books date back to the 19th century and cover topics like religion, British art, architecture, history, literature, romance languages and travel, reflecting the academic interests of the period. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.
    • Girolamini Library, Naples, Italy.
    • Girolamini Library - Naples, Italy. One of the richest and oldest libraries in Italy.
    • Harvard University Library, 1341 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
    • Harvard University Library - comprises about 90 libraries, with more than 16 million volumes. It is the oldest library system in the United States, the largest academic and the largest private library system in the world. Based on the number of volumes in the collection, it is the third largest library collection in the US, after the Library of Congress, and Boston Public Library.
    • Library of Congress: Thomas Jefferson Building.
    • Library of Congress' reading room.
    • LIBRARY OF CONGRESS - the largest library in the world by shelf space and holds the largest number of books.
    • Morgan Library & Museum - museum and research library located at 225 Madison Avenue at East 36th Street in the Murray Hill neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. It was founded to house the private library of J. P. Morgan in 1906, which included manuscripts and printed books, some of them in rare bindings, as well as his collection of prints and drawings.
    • National Library of Scotland - reference library with world-class collections. NLS is also Scotland's largest library and one of the major research libraries in Europe.
    • National Library of the Czech Republic, Clementinum, Prague, Czech Republic.
    • National Library of the Czech Republic - since 1777. The library's main building is located in the historical Clementinum building in Prague, where approximately half of its books are kept. As well as Czech texts, the library also stores older material from Turkey, Iran and India. The library won international recognition in 2005 as it received the inaugural Jikji Prize from UNESCO via the Memory of the World Programme for its efforts in digitising old texts. The project, which commenced in 1992, involved the digitisation of 1,700 documents in its first 13 years.
    • NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY - consists of 87 libraries: four non-lending research libraries, four main lending libraries, a library for the blind and physically challenged, and 77 neighborhood branch libraries in the three boroughs served. Together the collections total more than 50 million items, and the books number more than 20 million, a number surpassed only by the Library of Congress and the British Library.
    • Philological Library of Freie Universität Berlin, Habelschwerdter Allee 45, 14195 Berlin, Germany.
    • Philological Library - the newest component of the "Rust and Silver Lodges" complex in the main campus of the Freie Universität Berlin. It was designed by internationally known architect Norman Foster, Baron Foster of Thames Bank in the shape of a human brain, and opened in 2005. The library merges the separate smaller libraries of the departments and institutes of humanities. Germany
    • Pontifical Lateran University Library, Romew, Italy.
    • Pontifical Lateran University Library - the Pius IX Library, established in 1773, boasts 500,000 documents, 650 journals, 7 floors, 6 subject-specific areas and also includes reading rooms. Rome, Italy.
    • Powell Library, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A.
    • Powell Library - main college undergraduate library on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). It was constructed from 1926 to 1929 and was one of the original four buildings that comprised the UCLA campus in the early period of the university's life. Its Romanesque Revival architecture design, its historic value and its popularity with students make it one of the defining images of UCLA. Like the building facing it across the quad, Royce Hall, the building's exterior is modeled after Milan's Basilica of Sant'Ambrogio.
    • Private library at Château de Groussay, Montfort-l'Amaury, Department of Yvelines, France.
    • PRIVATE LIBRARY AT ChÂteau de Groussay - used by Cecil Beaton as the model for Henry Higgins' library in My Fair Lady.
    • PROJECT GUTENBERG - the first producer of free electronic books (ebooks).
    • Riggs Library, Georgetown University, located in the south tower of Healy Hall, Georgetown, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.
    • Riggs Library - one of the few cast iron libraries in the nation and one of even fewer that are still used to house books. Georgetown University - located in the south tower of Healy Hall. Georgetown, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.
    • Royal Portuguese Reading Room, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    • Royal Portuguese Reading Room - has the largest and most valuable literary of Portuguese outside Portugal. Constructed between 1880 and 1887, it has more than 350,000 volumes in a library, fully computerized. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    • Salt Lake City Public Library, 210 East, 400 South, Salt Lake City, Utah.
    • Salt Lake City Public Library - architecturally unique structure in Salt Lake City, Utah. The whole library depends on natural lighting, reducing the need of lights in the library. A huge five story glass wall is where most of the light comes from.
    • Library of Strahov Monastery: The Theological Hall, Prague, Czech Republic.
    • Strahov Monastery Library - Theological Hall completed in 1679. Prague, Czech Republic.
    • The Black Diamond (Royal Danish Library), Søren Kierkegaards Plads 1, 1221 Copenhagen K, Denmark.
    • The Black Diamond - modern waterfront extension to the Royal Danish Library's old building on Slotsholmen in central Copenhagen, Denmark. Its quasi-official nickname is a reference to its polished black granite cladding and irregular angles. Completed in 1999 as the first in a series of large-scale cultural buildings along Copenhagen's waterfront. Apart from its function as a library, the building houses a number of other public facilities and activities. The facilities include a 600-seat auditorium, the Queen's Hall, used for concerts—mainly chamber music and jazz—literary events, theatrical performances and conferences. There are also exhibition spaces, a bookshop, a restaurant, a café and a roof terrace.
    • THE EUROPEAN LIBRARY - searches the content of European national libraries.
    • THE FREE LIBRARY - (19,266,820 articles & books: March 21, 2010): news, magazines, newspapers, journals, reference articles and classic books.
    • THE SHAKESPEARE CENTRE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVE - at The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, Stratford-upon-Avon.
    • Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library in the University of Toronto.
    • Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library - library in the University of Toronto, constituting the largest repository of publicly accessible rare books and manuscripts in Canada. Among the collection's items are the Nuremberg Chronicle (1493), Shakespeare's First Folio (1623), Newton's Principia (1687), and Darwin's proof copy (with annotations) of On the Origin of Species (1859). Other collections include Babylonian cuneiform tablet from Ur (1789 BC), 36 Egyptian papyrus manuscript fragments (245 BC), and Catholicon (1460).
    • Trinity College Library, College Street, Dublin 2, Ireland.
    • Trinity College Library - this university library is the largest library in Ireland, comprising of several different buildings that are home nearly 5 million volumes. The oldest (constructed in 1592) and most beautiful of the library buildings houses the Early Printed Books Reading Room and the Manuscripts Reading Room. The library's most famous holding is a copy of The Book of Kells, an illuminated manuscript dating from the 6th century.
    • The Sistine Hall of the Vatican Library.
    • VATICAN LIBRARY - formally established in 1475. One of the oldest libraries in the world and contains one of the most significant collections of historical texts. Holds some 75,000 manuscripts and over 1.1 million printed books.
    • WILEY ONLINE LIBRARY - hosts the world's broadest and deepest multidisciplinary collection of online resources covering life, health and physical sciences, social science, and the humanities. It delivers seamless integrated access to over 4 million articles from 1500 journals, 9000 books, and hundreds of reference works, laboratory protocols and databases.
    Literary Awards & Prizes
  • The Nobel Prize in Literature.
  • AWARD ANNALS - the literary award database.
  • Bob Dylan - I'll be at the Nobel Prize ceremony... if I can - The Telegraph.
  • How do Nobel laureates spend their winnings? - The Guardian.
  • How to write a Man Booker novel - The Guardian.
  • LIST OF LITERARY AWARDS - Wikipedia.
  • List of the world's richest literary prizes - Wikipedia.
  • NOBEL LAUREATES IN LITERATURE - Nobel Foundation.
    • Agatha Award - since 1989. Literary awards for mystery and crime writers who write via the same method as Agatha Christie (i.e. closed setting, no sex or violence, amateur detective).
    • AMERICAN BOOK AWARD - established in 1978 by the Before Columbus Foundation. It seeks to recognize outstanding literary achievement by contemporary American authors, without restriction to race, sex, ethnic background, or genre.
    • Anthony Awards - literary awards for mystery writers presented at the Bouchercon World Mystery Convention since 1986.
    • Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award - Swedish children's literature award.
    • Bad Sex in Fiction Award - since 1993. Presented annually by The Literary Review.
    • BARRY AWARD - crime literary prize awarded annually since 1997 by the editors of Deadly Pleasures, an American quarterly publication for crime fiction readers. From 2007-2009 the award was jointly presented with the publication Mystery News. The prize is named after Barry Gardner, an American critic.
    • Betty Trask Award - since 1984. Are for first novels written by authors under the age of 35, who reside in a current or former Commonwealth nation. Each year the awards total £20,000, with one author receiving a larger prize amount, called the "Prize", and the remainder given to one or more other writers, called the "Awards".
    • BOOKER PRIZES - the Man Booker Prize for Fiction is a literary prize awarded each year for the best original full-length novel, written in the English language, by a citizen of the Commonwealth of Nations, Ireland, or Zimbabwe. The winner of the Man Booker Prize is generally assured of international renown and success; therefore, the prize is of great significance for the book trade. It is also a mark of distinction for authors to be selected for inclusion in the shortlist or even to be nominated for the "longlist".
    • BOWDOIN PRIZE - prestigious award given annually to Harvard University undergraduate and graduate students. It is considered among the highest academic commendations the University can bestow upon a student.
    • Carnegie Medal - since 1936. British literary award that annually recognises one outstanding new book for children or young adults.
    • Cartier Diamond Dagger - award given by the Crime Writers' Association of Great Britain to authors who have made an outstanding lifetime's contribution to the genre.
    • Costa Book Awards - series of literary awards given to books by authors based in Great Britain and Ireland. The awards, launched in 1971, are given both for high literary merit but also for works that are enjoyable reading and whose aim is to convey the enjoyment of reading to the widest possible audience. As such, they are a more populist literary prize than the Booker Prize.
    • CRIME THRILLER AWARDS - British awards ceremony dedicated to crime thriller fiction.
    • CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger - annual award given by the British Crime Writers' Association for best thriller of the year. The award is sponsored by the estate of Ian Fleming and is given to "best adventure/thriller novel in the vein of James Bond".
    • CWA New Blood Dagger - annual award given by the British Crime Writers' Association (CWA) for first books by previously unpublished writers.
    • DILEY AWARD - presented every year since 1992 by the Independent Mystery Booksellers Association. It is given to the mystery title of the year which the member booksellers have most enjoyed selling.
    • Duncan Lawrie International Dagger - first awarded in 2006. The richest crime-writing prize in the world. Award given by the Crime Writers' Association for best translated crime novel of the year.
    • Edgar Awards - presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America. They honor the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction, television, film, and theatre published or produced in the previous year.
    • European Crime Fiction Awards
    • European Crime Fiction Star Award
    • Financial Times & McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award - since 2005. Annual award given to the best business book of the year as determined by the Financial Times and McKinsey & Company. It aims to find the book that has ‘the most compelling and enjoyable insight into modern business issues.’
    • Fitzgerald Literary Award - the Scott Fitzgerald prize is awarded annually in May and reward a literary novel reflecting "the elegance, wit, style and taste of the art of living" of the American writer, author of The Great Gatsby by the Society Club at Hôtel Belles Rives at Juan-les-Pins, France.
    • Franz Kafka Prize - an international literary award presented in honour of Franz Kafka, the German language novelist. The prize was first awarded in 2001 and is co-sponsored by the Franz Kafka Society and the city of Prague, Czech Republic.
    • GALAXY BRITISH BOOK AWARDS - the Oscars of the book world.
    • Goethe Medal - since 1955. Also known as the Goethe-Medaille, is a yearly prize given by the Goethe Institute honoring non-Germans for meritorious contributions in the spirit of the Institute. It is an official decoration of the Federal Republic of Germany. The prize was given on March 22, the anniversary of Goethe's death. After 2008 it is given on August 28, the anniversary of Goethe's birth.
    • GOLD DAGGER AWARDS - given annually by the Crime Writers' Association for the best crime novel of the year.
    • Grand prix de littÉrature policiÈre - since 1948.
    • Grand Prix du roman de l'AcadÉmie franÇaise - French literary award, created in 1918, and given each year by the Académie française. Along with the Prix Goncourt, it is one of the oldest and most prestigious literary awards in France. The Académie française gives out over 60 literary awards each year, the Grand Prix du roman is the most senior for an individual novel.
    • Gumshoe Awards - since 2002. American award for popular crime fiction literary works. The Gumshoe Awards are awarded annually by the American Internet magazine Mystery Ink (not to be confused with Mystery Inc.) to recognize the best achievements in crime fiction.
    • Gutenberg Prize
    • Hans Christian Andersen Awards - known as the "Nobel Prize for childen's literature".
    • Helmerich Award - since 1985. American literary prize awarded by the Tulsa Library Trust in Tulsa, Oklahoma. It is bestowed annually upon an "internationally acclaimed" author who has "written a distinguished body of work and made a major contribution to the field of literature and letters".
    • International Prize for Arabic Fiction - literary prize managed in association with the Booker Prize Foundation in London, and supported by the Emirates Foundation in Abu Dhabi.
    • James Tait Black Memorial Prizes - founded in 1919. Are among the oldest and most prestigious book prizes awarded for literature written in the English language and are Britain's oldest literary awards.
    • LES DEUX MAGOTS LITERARY PRIZE - awarded to a French novel every year since 1933.
    • LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZES - the Prizes "currently have nine single-title categories: biography, current interest, fiction, first fiction (the Art Seidenbaum Award added in 1991), history, mystery/thriller (category added in 2000), poetry, science and technology (category added in 1989), and young adult fiction (category added in 1998). In addition, the Robert Kirsch Award is presented annually to a living author with a substantial connection to the American West whose contribution to American letters deserves special recognition."
    • Macavity Awards - literary award for mystery writers. Nominated and voted upon annually by the members of the Mystery Readers International.
    • Martin Beck Award - since 1971. Award given by the Swedish Crime Writers' Academy (Svenska Deckarakademin) for the best crime novel in translation. It is one of the most prestigious international crime-writing awards.
    • National Book Awards - British literary award for the best UK writers and their works, as selected by an academy of members from the British book publishing industry.
    • NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS - a set of American literary awards. Started in 1950, the Awards are presented annually to American authors for literature published in the prior year.
    • NERO AWARD - literary award for excellence in the mystery genre presented by The Wolfe Pack, a society founded in 1978.
    • NOBEL PRIZE IN LITERATURE - awarded annually, since 1901, to an author from any country who has, in the words from the will of Alfred Nobel, produced "in the field of literature the most outstanding work in an ideal direction".
    • O. Henry Award - annual American award given to short stories of exceptional merit. The award is named after the American short story writer, O. Henry.
    • Ondaatje Prize - annual literary award given by the Royal Society of Literature. The £10,000 award is given for a work of fiction, non-fiction or poetry which evokes the "spirit of a place", and which is written by someone who is a citizen of or who has been resident in the Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland.
    • Orwell Prize - since 1993. British prize for political writing of outstanding quality. Two prizes are awarded each year: one for a book and one for journalism; between 2009 and 2012, a third prize was awarded for blogging. In each case, the winner is the short-listed entry which comes closest to George Orwell's own ambition to "make political writing into an art".
    • Premio Nadal - the oldest literary prize in the Spanish-speaking world. Spanish literary prize awarded annually by the publishing house Ediciones Destino, part of Planeta. It has been awarded every year on 6 January since 1944.
    • Prix Archon-DespÉrouses - Prix de poésie. Prix annuel créé en 1834, attribué à des œuvres de poètes.
    • Prix Cazes brasserie Lipp - awarded to a French novel every year since 1935.
    • Prix Femina - French literary prize created in 1904 by 22 writers for the magazine La Vie heureuse (today known as Femina). The prize is decided each year by an exclusively female jury, although the authors awarded are not limited to women. The winner is announced on the first Wednesday of November each year.
    • Prix Goncourt - since 1903. Prize in French literature, given by the académie Goncourt to the author of "the best and most imaginative prose work of the year". Four other prizes are also awarded: prix Goncourt du Premier Roman (first novel), prix Goncourt de la Nouvelle (short story), prix Goncourt de la Poésie (poetry) and prix Goncourt de la Biographie (biography). Of the "big six" French literary awards, the Prix Goncourt is the best known and most prestigious. The other major literary prizes are the Grand Prix du Roman de l'Académie Française, the Prix Femina, the Prix Renaudot, the Prix Interallié and the Prix Médicis.
    • PULITZER PRIZES - U.S. award for achievements in newspaper journalism, literature and musical composition.
    • REUBEN AWARD - for Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year, chosen by a secret ballot of the members of the National Cartoonists Society.
    • RIPPER AWARD - since 2008.
    • Robert F. Kennedy Book Award - since 1980. Annual award presented to the book which "most faithfully and forcefully reflects Robert Kennedy's purposes."
    • SHAMUS AWARD - awarded annually by the Private Eye Writers of America (PWA) for the best detective fiction genre novels and short stories of the year.
    • Specsavers National Book Awards - or simply NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS — previously known as the Galaxy National Book Awards (2010–11); British Book Awards or Nibbies (1990–2009) — is a British literary award for the best UK writers and their works, as selected by an academy of members from the British book publishing industry.
    • SUNDAY TIMES AWARD FOR LITERARY EXCELLENCE - Oxford Literary Festival.
    • The Blixen Literary award - Wikipedia.
    • THE CRIME WRITERS' ASSOCIATION DAGGER AWARDS
    • THE EDGAR AWARDS - named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America. They honor the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction, television, film, and theatre published or produced in the previous year.
    • THE MAN BOOKER PRIZES - literary prize awarded each year for the best original full-length novel, written in the English language, by a citizen of the Commonwealth of Nations, Ireland, or Zimbabwe. The winner of the Man Booker Prize is generally assured of international renown and success; therefore, the prize is of great significance for the book trade. It is also a mark of distinction for authors to be selected for inclusion in the shortlist or even to be nominated for the "longlist".
    • THE MAN BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE - is unique in the world of literature in that it can be won by an author of any nationality, providing that his or her work is available in the English language. It is awarded every second year.
    • THE SHAMUS AWARDS - awarded by the Private Eye Writers of America (PWA) for the best detective fiction genre novels and short stories of the year.
    • T.S. ELIOT PRIZE - inaugurated in 1993 in celebration of the Poetry Book Society's 40th birthday and in honour of its founding poet, T. S. Eliot.
    • Wellcome Book Prize - since 2009. Annual British literary award sponsored by Wellcome Trust. In keeping with the vision and goals of Wellcome Trust, the Book Prize "celebrates the topics of health and medicine in literature", including fiction and non-fiction. The winner receives £30,000 making it "one of the most remunerative literature awards on offer."
    Self-Publishing
  • Print on demand.
  • 7 tips for book marketing - "Finally. After countless months of writing and rewriting, brainstorming and brain farting, editing and re-editing, your book is being published. The labor of your love is in your hands. It’s being sold on Amazon. It’s being shipped to Barnes & Noble."
  • From paying the bills, to £2,000 a day: making a killing from self-publishing - "Her Last Tomorrow, Adam Croft’s latest DIY thriller, lifted his bedroom business into the sales stratosphere. He talks about paying off his mortgage in weeks and why he’s fine with publishers being ‘sniffy’."
  • PRINT ON DEMAND - Wikipedia.
  • SELF-PUBLISHING - Wikipedia.
  • TOP 10 BEST SELF-PUBLISHING COMPANIES - "Choosing one of the best self-publishing companies can make a difference in a book's performance. If you will self-publish your book, you need to read this."
  • Top 10 Self-Publishing Companies for First-Time Authors in 2018 - "Choosing a trustworthy publishing company can be unnerving. Here are the top 10 self-publishing companies that could help you publish your book."
  • Vanity Press - definition & explanation.
    • Barnes & Noble Press - since 2010. "How to Self-Publish with Us." Publishing with B&N Press is as easy as 1, 2, 3. You can easily create different formats of your book, publish, and get sales reporting - all in one place. Barnes & Noble Press offers a variety of resources to help you drive awareness and sales of your book, from marketing tips and advice to exclusive merchandising programs.
    • BLURB - since 2004. "Blurb helps you tell and share your stories: in bookstore-quality books, on the web, and with your mobile. Your genius, our tools."
    • bookbaby - since 2010. "The first truly affordable book editing solution for self-published authors." Self-publishing made easy: from cover design, book printing, eBook conversions, distribution, website creation, and more. Self-publish, print and distribute your book worldwide at Amazon, Kindle, Apple Books and Barnes & Noble. BookBaby distributes the works of independent authors, making their titles available in retailers in over 170 countries around the globe.
    • CreateSpace - since 2000. An Amazon company. "We now offer specialized options for your different publishing needs. Login to get started with Kindle Direct Publishing, Manufacturing on Demand, or Print on Demand for publishers." Self-publish eBooks and paperbacks for free and reach millions of readers on Amazon.
    • Draft2Digital - since 2012. "We’ll convert your Word document into an ebook with clean chapter breaks, a functioning table of contents, and optional endmatter to help you generate more sales. Want to print it? We can do that too."
    • FLIPPING BOOK - since 2004. "Every business can get more from their documents." Transform your PDFs into HTML5 documents that have a professional look and feel, marketing tools, and analytics.
    • IBOOKS AUTHOR - since 2002. "Create and publish amazing Multi-Touch books for iPad." Available free on the Mac App Store, iBooks Author is an amazing app that allows anyone to create beautiful textbooks - and just about any other kind of book - for iPad, iPhone, and Mac. With galleries, video, interactive diagrams, 3D objects, mathematical expressions, and more, these books bring content to life in ways the printed page never could.
    • IngramSpark - since 2013. "Master Print and Digital Self-Publishing." A premier services partner for the independent publisher, IngramSpark offers self-publishers, authors, and small publishing houses easy access to distribution, production, creation, and book assembly services in one location, at a price point they can afford.
    • KIM WEISS PUBLISHING SERVICES - since 1994. "From Brainstorm to Bestseller. An Insider's Look at Publishing Your Book."
    • Kobo Writing Life - since 2012. "Publish with Kobo Writing Life. Reach millions of Kobo readers around the world." Publish your eBook in a few short steps.Just create a Kobo Writing Life account, upload your manuscript, and set the price. We’ll add it to the Kobo catalogue within 72 hours and keep it there as long as you want.
    • Lightning Source - since 1996. "Publishing Solutions for Everyone." No matter your size, Ingram’s Lightning Source has an on-demand print solution tailored to your business’ needs. Print-on-demand solutions to deliver the books your customers want with speed and efficiency.
    • LULU BLOG - since 2002. "Lulu is dedicated to making the world a better place, one book at a time, through sustainable practices, innovative print-on-demand products and a commitment to excellent service."
    • MOVABLE TYPE - since 2001. "Professional publishing platform." Free software weblog publishing system.
    • Outskirts Press Self-Publishing - since 2002. "Outskirts Press helps authors develop and publish high-quality books by offering exceptional design, printing, publishing, distribution, and book marketing services. Top Consumer Reviews ranks us #1 because we deliver outstanding customer service, affordable pricing, industry-leading royalties, and a team of hands-on, US-based publishing experts (many of whom are writers themselves). In short, we take the complexity and guesswork out of publishing, and our mission is to help you publish the book of your dreams."
    • PRINTONDEMAND.COM - "You can harness the latest advancements in printing technology to print your books when you need them, with professional quality, and at the speed the rest of the world expects!"
    • PRINTONDEMAND-WORLDWIDE.COM - since 1994. "Printondemand-worldwide offers publishers a complete end to end publishing solution, from publishing services to affordable mono & HD colour printing." Printondemand-worldwide is one of the UK's longest established, award winning, digital book and journal printers.
    • SMASHWORDS - since 2008. "your ebook.your way." The world's largest distributor of indie ebooks. We make it fast, free and easy for any author or publisher, anywhere in the world, to publish and distribute ebooks to the major retailers and thousands of libraries. In our first year, we published 140 books from 90 authors. Our catalog reached 6,000 books in 2009, 28,800 in 2010, 92,000 in 2011, 191,000 in 2012 and as of this writing (November 2018) stands at over 500,000 titles.
    • THE BOOK PATCH - since 2009. "Affordable and Easy Self Publishing." At TheBookPatch we provide a very affordable solution to printing small to medium size quantities of books. We even have a free bookstore you can send your customers to so they can purchase your book. We literally charge you nothing for this service other than the cost of printing and shipping - and your readers pay that, you pay nothing!
    • Virtual Bookworm - since 2000. "Virtualbookworm specializes in print-on-demand and self-publishing, marketing services, cover and layout design, eBook publishing and sales and more."
    • Xlibris - since 1997. "Xlibris offers a wide selection of services and packages, including Black & White or Full Color book publishing, editing, printing, and marketing."
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